OUR VIEW: Too many secrets

Despite years of openness promises, politicians still keep too many secrets

Almost every election, whether it be local, provincial or federal, there are bound to be some politicians telling us they are going to bring more openness and transparency to government.

By now, if they had all followed through, every conversation, every memo, every communication, every meeting would be available for public review.

Clearly, not many elected politicians ever followed through on those openness and transparency promises.

It’s unlikely we’ll ever see much change on this front. Even if serious policy changes were made requiring more openness on the part of politicians and bureaucrats, their effectiveness would be questionable. There are just too many ways to keep conversations off the books, from chatting at the watercooler or other informal discussions.

The question is, does it matter? It can be argued that some deal-making has to take place behind closed doors so that the parties can negotiate openly.

Well, we saw the results of that with the whole SNC-Lavalin affair. It would be naive to think this was the only time such an incident occurred, or that it is something limited to the Trudeau’s Liberal government.

It’s likely that almost every government, Conservative or Liberal, has done something like this behind closed doors at one time or another, during their time in power. Of course, with the process being hidden, it just makes it all the worse when it comes into public view. And when it does, politicians, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in this case, make the outrage even worse by trying to continue the cover-up.

It’s also true at a personal level for politicians, as was observed in Conservative leader Andrew Scheer’s resignation last week. Speaking in Parliament, he talked about needing to devote more time to his family and other pressures of leadership.

He didn’t talk about allegations he used Conservative party funds to pay for his children’s private school. The party later said it was an authorized expense, but we will likely never know the full story.

Like his misleading information about his previous career and dual citizenship during the election campaign, he would have been better to address the issue forthrightly and before it became a problem.

There’s a lesson there for all our aspiring political leaders.

–Black Press

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Hitched Wedding and Event Affair is a busy affair

This year Hitched is happening at the Comox Community Centre.

Campbell River Storm topple Oceanside Generals 6-3 in home victory

Storm goals scored by six different players

Teal Harle wraps up X Games appearance with personal bests

Finished 12th in ski big air, 11th in ski slopestyle

Decor details: Professional rental and design businesses deliver it all

Stop by the Comox Community Centre today from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.!

Burger and a beer for a cause? Yes, please.

John Howard Society hopes Feb. 3 fundraiser at Match will sponsor one child in KidStart

WATCH: Find a perfect venue at Hitched Wedding & Events Affair

Check out vendors, venues and more at the Comox Community Centre today until 4 p.m.

Canada’s basketball community mourns Kobe Bryant after helicopter crash

Bryant was an 18-time NBA all-star who won five championships

‘Devastated’: Fans, celebrities remember Kobe Bryant after his death

Bryant played all of his 20-year career with the NBA with the Los Angeles Lakers

Investigation launched after six dead puppies dumped in Richmond hotel parking lot

RAPS reminds people they can always give up puppies they can’t take care of

Canadian Lunar New Year celebrations dampened by coronavirus worries

But Health Minister Patty Hajdu said today that the risk of infection is low

B.C. VIEWS: New coronavirus outbreak an important reminder

Walking the line between cautious and alarmist

Kobe Bryant, daughter killed in California helicopter crash

Bryant entered the NBA draft straight out of high school in 1996

Risk of coronavirus low in B.C. as first case emerges in Toronto: officials

There have been no confirmed cases of the virus in B.C.

Most Read