OUR VIEW: End to wasteful program

No place for a registry for rifles used only for sport

The looming end of the federal long gun registry is good news for taxpayers.

It shows that the federal government is willing to get rid of programs that serve little to no purpose, and waste tax  dollars in the process. While the Conservatives have long had this program in their sights, let’s hope there are more to follow.

The gun registry was, from the very beginning, a highly political move. The Liberals, under Justice Minister Allan Rock, wanted to show city voters that they would be tough on gun owners. It was all about cementing urban voting blocs, and for the most part, it worked.

The Liberals’ crumbling power base remains at  its strongest in big city downtowns, particularly Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver. However, one reason that Liberal support has dramatically fallen off in other areas is the gun registry, which has been a waste of almost $2 billion, and has done almost nothing to stop crime.

Police access the database frequently, but all it does it alert them to the possibility that there may be guns in a specific home. It has been used to arrest legitimate gun owners whose only offence has been improper storage. Yet the registry does nothing to stop gun violence – most of which is committed with unregistered handguns smuggled into Canada from the U.S.

Members of the public, even those who have never handled a gun, can recognize a waste of tax dollars when they see it – particularly when the auditor-general has laid it bare on more than one occasion.

There is definitely a place for a registry for handguns, as has been in place in Canada since the 1930s. This is a key reason why gun violence here is minimal, as compared to the U.S. But there is no place for a registry of rifles and shotguns that are used for sport, and rarely used in crimes.

– Black Press

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