Compel government to invest in homeless crisis

Homelessness has increased exponentially and 180,000 homeless Canadians are staying in emergency shelters annually

I was pleased to read the article, “Sponsor a room in the extreme weather shelter” (Oct. 30) to find that the shelter is back for the winter season and in the capable hands of Paul Mason.

As a fourth-year nursing student, I recognize some of the difficulties of homelessness, such as maintaining an adequate and healthy diet, developing infections due to improper treatment of wounds, and accessing a safe place to store medications.

I was involved as a volunteer in the fundraiser “The Coldest Night of the Year” this past February and have come to appreciate the benefits of this housing resource. Two years without any fatalities due to exposure is incredible and our community should be proud.

With the federal government’s cuts to affordable housing, homelessness has increased exponentially and 180,000 homeless Canadians are staying in emergency shelters annually.

But homelessness is not just an economical concern; it is a human one. How can we expect the health of those with mental illness or addictions to improve if they are discharged back into such dreadful circumstances?

As Canadians, we have a voice that can bring about change by compelling the government to invest in the crisis of homelessness.

Holly McQueen