City of Chilliwack staffer Steve Clegg testing coloured water samples coming from a greenhouse property. (Jennifer Feinberg/ The Progress)

What turned the water pink? B.C. greenhouse worker made mistake with flower dye

Chilliwack greenhouse owner says ‘no immediate danger’ from non-toxic dye released into waterway

It was a non-toxic flower dye from a greenhouse that made a Chilliwack waterway turn pink last week.

Leo Quik, who owns the greenhouse operation on McSween Road, said a worker was dyeing flowers for Easter when they sent the dye down the wrong drain.

Dark pink water could be seen dripping out of a large white pipe at the rear of the greenhouse, directly into the Camp Slough last Friday. A resident called the ministry of environment.

“The substance released into the waterway was completely non-toxic, and we confirmed that in discussions with the supplier of the product, which came from a reputable manufacturer,” said Quik.

READ MORE: Slough turns pink

He said he hired an environmental consultant to help them contain the discoloured water and plan out remediation options. “We believe there is no immediate danger now to either the local wildlife or the environment.”

Quik’s Farm, which has operating for 29 years, employs up to 70 people and emphasizes environmental sustainability with best practices for growing and handling.

“We have set handling procedures, and unfortunately that is where the mistake was made.”

A dead beaver found in the slough was sent for a possible necropsy, though Quik said they’re confident the animal did not die because of the pink water.

Test results with more information are expected this week.


@CHWKjourno
jfeinberg@theprogress.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Campbell River homelessness groups prepare for winter in a pandemic

Winter presents unique challenges to people experiencing homelessness this year

The secret life of tadpoles

Vancouver Island photographer Maxwel Hohn’s documentary traces the ‘big little migration’ of western toad tadpoles

Construction starting on supportive housing at 580 Dogwood Street

The project is expected to be completed and ready to welcome residents early in the new year.

Another Sayward councillor resigns ahead of November byelection

Council will be able to maintain quorum till byelection is held, says Municipal Affairs Minister Robinson’s office

Record-breaking 165 new COVID-19 cases diagnosed in B.C. in 24-hour period

Fifty-seven people are in hospital battling the novel coronavirus

March to protect old growth, stop industrial logging coming to B.C. Legislature

Organizers say they want to give frontline communities a bigger say in nearby logging

B.C. releases details of $1.5B economic recovery plan, $660M in business tax incentives

Economic plan includes support for employers, as well as training for workers

‘Not criminally responsible’ hearing slated for man convicted of Abbotsford school stabbing

Gabriel Klein was found guilty in March of killing Letisha Reimer, 13, in 2016

Mount Cain planning a modified winter season for north Island ski and snowboarders

Skiing is a COVID-friendly activity, but shared public spaces require adjustment

Most Read