Water levels steady for fish and anglers

Water levels on the river and the lakes that feed the Campbell remain in good shape in spite of very dry July

An old-growth tree in the Campbell River remains a danger to swimmers, snorkelers and tubers.

The tree fell into the river in early 2012 and remains there, just below the John Hart Generating Station, and poses a danger to river users.

That’s why river access remains closed from the BC Hydro generating station, but there are still plenty of other, and safer, areas to access the river for recreation.

Speaking of that, water levels on the river and the lakes that feed the Campbell remain in good shape in spite of very dry July.

“The river flow below the generating station is around 40 cubic metres per second. This flow is ideal for the pink salmon recreation fishery,” said BC Hydro spokesman Stephen Watson in a news release. “The reservoirs upstream are also well-positioned for good recreation activities. The system is being managed as well as possible given the amount of water abundance.”

The Upper Campbell Reservoir/Buttle Lake is currently at 219 metres and is about half a metre below normal at this time of year. It reached a high of 219.2 metres (220.5 metres is considered full) on July 14 and has been hovering near that level since then.

Water run-off into the reservoir is currently about 30 cubic metres per second.

BC Hydro’s water supply forecast is showing water inflows into the Campbell River reservoirs between now and the end of September may only be about 79 per cent of normal.

BC Hydro is running the John Hart Generating Station at about 34 megawatts, or about 30 per cent of capacity, to provide target river flows for this time of year.

“This benefits fish and river recreation. It also conserves water for the benefit of upstream reservoir levels.” Watson said.

BC Hydro forecasts the reservoir to be around 218 metres by the end of September.