Trans Mountain like Monty Python’s dead parrot under Trudeau government: Scheer

Conservative leader say prime minister wants everyone to believe the project is still alive

Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer stands during question period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick)

The federal Opposition leader is suggesting the Liberals have no intention of beginning the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion before next year’s election.

Andrew Scheer likens it to Monty Python’s dead parrot sketch because Prime Minister Justin Trudeau wants everyone to believe the Alberta-to-B.C. oil pipeline is still alive.

Scheer made his remarks at the Energy Relaunch conference in Calgary.

The Liberal government purchased the existing Trans Mountain pipeline from Kinder Morgan earlier this year for $4.5 billion after the U.S. firm became frustrated by political roadblocks.

An expansion to nearly triple the line’s capacity is in limbo following a Federal Court of Appeal ruling in August that requires more Indigenous consultation and research into increased tanker traffic.

READ MORE: Trans Mountain CEO says pipe construction could restart in 2019 on NEB timeline

In his speech, Scheer accused Trudeau of being hostile to the energy sector and said a Conservative prime minister would get private companies to build market-opening pipelines.

“I believe it is Justin Trudeau’s strategy to not have this pipeline even started to be built by the next election. He just can’t admit that it will be dead by the next election,” Scheer said Thursday.

“It’s a little bit like the Monty Python dead parrot sketch. He just wants everyone to believe that it’s not quite gone yet.”

READ MORE: Federal court quashes approval of Trans Mountain pipeline expansion

Earlier in the day, Alberta’s United Conservative Leader Jason Kenney told the crowd that if he becomes premier after next spring’s election, he will set up a war room to take on critics of the province’s energy industry in real time.

Kenney said his “fight-back strategy” would also include paying legal bills for Indigenous communities in favour of resource development and targeting charitable groups that want to shut down Alberta’s energy industry.

He said Alberta would not do business with banks that have boycotted the oilsands.

“It’s time for us to identify our greatest points of leverage on these issues,” he said.

Lauren Krugel, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Campbell River’s ‘school of hack’ gives kids inside computing edge

Teachers take ‘hacking’ back to its roots with school program

UPDATED: Man survived for ‘days’ trapped in smashed truck north of Campbell River

Duncan Moffat, 23, found by hunter beside Hwy. 19 near Sayward

Gas prices on Vancouver Island to drop six cents

But a ‘volatile’ market could lead to increases in the coming weeks

Helpline assists Campbell River families tackling the dementia journey

No one in Campbell River should have to face the dementia journey… Continue reading

People flocking to Vancouver Island city to see hundreds of sea lions

Each year the combination of Steller and California sea lions take over Cowichan Bay

Early data suggests no spike in pot-impaired driving after legalization: police

Some departments said it’s too early to provide data, others said initial numbers suggest stoned driving isn’t on the rise

Protesters confront Environment Minister in B.C.

Protesters wanting more for killer whales confront Catherine McKenna

Humans reshaping evolutionary history of species around the globe: paper

University of British Columbia researcher had the paper published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society

Toronto ‘carding’ activist Desmond Cole stopped by police in Vancouver

Cole says his experience reveals what daily life is like for black and Indigenous residents

Commercial trucks banned from left lane of Coquihalla

B.C.’s Ministry of Transportation has introduced a new program that hopes to prevent accidents and closures on the Coquihalla Highway.

B.C. on track to record same number of overdose deaths as last year

128 people died of overdoses in September, bringing the total to more than 1,100 so far in 2018

Cowichan school district defends lack of notice to parents following elementary student arrest

Officials with School District 79 stand by their decision not to send out an alert.

B.C. firefighters rescue horse stuck in mud

‘It happens more often than you’d think,’ says deputy chief

Most Read