The city will include increasing the number of RCMP members at the Campbell River detachment in their upcoming budget discussions. The detachment has not seen an increase in membership since 2007. Photo by Mike Davies/Campbell River Mirror

The Campbell River RCMP detachment is calling for backup

Police force hasn’t seen a membership increase in a decade while population has increased 13 per cent

The local RCMP detachment needs more police, according to the business case presented to the city’s Committee of the Whole.

Included as part of the lead-up to council’s upcoming 2018-2027 Financial Planning sessions, the report says the RCMP detachment has not had an increase in its numbers since 2007 and the detachment is finding it “increasingly difficult to meet current service delivery expectations set by mayor and council.”

And since the last increase at the detachment, Campbell River’s population has increased by approximately 13.2 per cent.

“This population increase has placed growing demands on already stretched police resources,” the report says. “In particular, a lack of front-line police officers has made it extremely difficult to implement proactive crime reduction initiatives targeting public intoxication and alcohol-related crime & disorder occurring within Campbell River’s downtown core.”

The report not only cites an increasing “case burden” – the average number of criminal code cases investigated by each member – but also says this level has increased “at a time when the growing complexity and diversity of police investigations have placed further demands on police resources.”

“Even routine investigations which once took minutes now may take hours due to increased investigative requirements to meet the standard of proof for charge approval, mandatory reporting, technological advances and public demands for transparency and accountability,” the report continues.

The report also says the RCMP are also increasingly called upon to deal with “everything from lost property, noise complaints and school yard bullying through to cougar/bear sightings, neighbour disputes and dealing with Campbell River’s mentally ill and drug addicted population.

“In light of these growing workload demands it is prudent and necessary to increase authorized strength in order to overcome growing operational changes as well as to ensure Campbell River RCMP is better positioned to meet current and future service delivery expectations.”

The report says increasing membership at the local detatchment is also fiscally prudent, as officers have been increasingly required to work overtime, which costs the city much more in the long run than simply adding staff.

The business case gave three solutions to the issue at hand: increase the detachment by one member in 2019 as per the Municipal Police Agreement and create another position to begin in 2021, increase their numbers by two regular members in 2019 or increase the detachment by one regular member and create a Public Safety Coordinator position to report to the City Manager.

The business case recommended the first option, saying by spreading out the increases over several years, it will both cut back on the overtime being put in by officers – and the costs associated with that – by also limit the tax increases on local tax payers versus adding two officers immediately.

The recommendation will be added to the list of items being considered during the city’s financial planning, which is scheduled to begin Dec. 4.

Just Posted

Federal fisheries minister calls for precautionary approach to fish farming

Government still reviewing Federal Court’s decision on PRV – Wilkinson

Risk of ‘deadly avalanches’ leads to warning for B.C.’s south coast

Weak layer of snow on Vancouver Island, Lower Mainland could trigger an avalanche

Healthier snacks coming to City of Campbell River facilities

City in the process of replacing high-sugar and high-fat snacks and beverages in vending machines

Families learn to navigate the perils of the Internet

Speaker talks to Campbell River kids, parents about staying safe in a social media world

‘Priceless’ hat stolen from Indigenous art store in Campbell River during break-in

Ernie Smith, co-owner of Awatin Aboriginal Art, looking for help in recovering stolen hat

Sell regulated heroin to curb B.C.’s overdose problem: report

B.C. Centre on Substance Use points to organized crime and money-laundering as contributing factors

B.C. legislature moving suspended staff controversy to outside review

Whale watching, Seattle Mariners trips billed as emergency preparedness, Speaker Darryl Plecas says

More people signing up for compulsory vaccines

Maple Ridge mom says public tired of hearing about measles

UPDATE: Man charged in stabbing of woman, off-duty cop outside B.C. elementary school

Manoj George, 49, is facing two counts of aggravated assault and two counts of assault with a weapon after the incident on Wednesday, Feb. 20.

Why do zebras have stripes? Perhaps to dazzle away flies

Researchers from University of Bristol look into why zebras have stripes

Poll: More voters believe Canada doing worse under Trudeau government

22 per cent believed the country is doing better and 27 per cent said things are the same

HBC shuttering Home Outfitters across Canada

North America’s oldest retailer is revamping its various stores to improve profitability

BC SPCA investigates Okanagan woman with prior animal abuse convictions

BC SPCA is investigating a property near Vernon

Man wanted for sex trafficking, confinement may be heading to B.C.

Kevin Myrthil, 26, is also accused of assault on a 19-year-old woman at an Edmonton hotel

Most Read