John Perlinger with his son JJ, after a Haircut for Good session in their home. (Submitted)

Haircuts for Good asking for donations through home haircuts

Donations can go to food banks or health-care foundations of your choice

If you’ve been staring at those scissors, trying to decide whether to cut your hair yourself, here’s a good reason to go for it.

Haircuts for Good is a new movement designed to raise money for health-care foundations and food banks. It’s a cause taken up by a Fraser Valley man, John Perlinger. And yes, it involves going public with those haircuts.

“The concept is to cut your own hair or the hair of a family member while directing the funds that you would have spent on a ‘professional’ haircut to the foundation of your choice,” Perlinger says. “Have some fun with it, challenge your friends to join in, and help us make this viral.”

After you’ve had your home haircut, he says, visit www.haircutsforhealthcare.com and make a donation.

“Share your beautiful scissor work (or less beautiful) to your social media accounts and use the hashtag#haircutsforgood while challenging a few of your friends or family to do the same,” he says.

Perlinger got it all going with a snazzy new haircut for his son, JJ.

While they first called the initiative Haircuts for Healthcare, they decided to expand to include food banks, too.

“With the massive amount of people out of work we wanted to be able to support those who are struggling to put necessary food on the table,” he says.

People have been using YouTube videos, advice from their stylists, and a whole lot of guts to keep their hair trimmed while hair salons are closed due to COVID-19 physical distancing measures. At the same time, organizations have had to cancel or adapt their fundraising events for the same reasons.

Perlinger’s initiative gels the two together in a creative way, in an effort to help support those who need it most.

“The COVID-19 pandemic is having a profound impact on healthcare providers – and their patients, families, and staff – worldwide,” he says. “While every foundation has its own needs based on their individual situations, they all rely on generous donors like you to fill the gap between government funding and the greater needs of their hospital.”

READ MORE: Hints of COVID-19 relief for B.C. as restaurants, haircuts considered


@CHWKcommunity
jpeters@theprogress.com

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