Child care and early childhood education – a precarious balance

  • Jan. 4, 2018 1:30 p.m.

Parents struggle to balance their work schedule and their family schedule all while trying to balance their finances.

You might say “it has always been the case.” But are today’s families facing greater or different challenges? Perhaps what has worked in the past no longer works today? Or perhaps we have just been accepting a child care and early education system that always should and could have been improved?

Politicians regularly promise to offer more help for families, but is heavily subsidized daycare what’s needed? Certainly it would help the finances of many families, but where is the education component? Is there sufficient flexibility?

Twenty years ago, the Quebec government began to offer heavily subsidize daycare spaces. Demand was very strong at first, yet the number of private, unsubsidized daycare spots has exploded, growing from a mere 1,600 in 2003 to more than 61,000 at the end of March 2017. The occupancy rate at subsidized home daycares has slid four percentage points in the past year, to 82.13 per cent. Why would people choose private over subsidized daycare?

Perhaps the answer could lie in perceived quality of care. Perhaps those families who can afford it want something more than a child-minding service.

At the next Philosopher’s Cafe on Jan. 10, Joanna Tancon helps explore some of the options that might be explored to better meet the needs of today’s families.

Tancon has been involved in the business of childcare for over 35 years; as an unlicensed babysitter, a Licence Not Required Provider, and as a Licenced In Home Daycare.

She has facilitated daycare support groups for childcare providers, and has watched many good providers grow frustrated with the antiquated age restrictions and difficult licencing protocols, and leave the business. She has attended numerous training workshops on meeting the emotional, mental and physical needs of young children, and has enjoyed being a resource person for young families. Passionate about the worth of good childcare, she has lobbied for years for change.

Join in Wednesday, Jan. 10 from 7 to 8 p.m. at Berwick to discuss this social challenge.

This is the latest in a free speaker series held once per month where a speaker will introduce a theme to the Café and then all who attend can join in respectful, non-partisan conversation – or just sit back and listen.

Organizers welcome the public to propose topics and introduce them at future Cafés. Themes should be of broad interest and national significance, and have an element of controversy.

At this session, Joanna Tancon will have just 10 minutes to introduce the topic, and then the floor is open for 50 minutes of moderated discussion.

Just Posted

City of Campbell River to study future impacts of sea level rise

$325,000 of the total project cost of $505,000 will come from grants, $180,000 from city itself

Campbell River man drives his 1927 Studebaker to his 90th birthday

Dave Proctor picked up his 1927 Studebaker in 1957 when he spotted… Continue reading

Bald is beautiful

Campbell River couple raise money for mental health, shave heads in celebration

Campbell River to mark Day of Mourning for those killed on the job

Workers killed on the job will be remembered in Campbell River on… Continue reading

Campbell River city council considering going ‘blue’

Move would involve banning bottled water at all city facilities and events

Shania Twain visits Canadian Armed Forces base in B.C.

Canadian country icon thanks members of CFB Esquimalt for their service

Countdown is on to the 2018 B.C. Summer Games

Cowichan Valley hosts on July 19-22

Driving Change: A B.C. man’s charitable trip across Canada

A Kelowna man, his bus, and his mission for positive change across our country

Case of teacher secretly filming teens reaches top court

Acquittal of teacher, Ryan Jarvis, who secretly videoed teens ‘dangerous,’ top court told

Why a 14-year-old will lead the charge at annual marijuana protest on the Hill

Marijuana enthusiasts have long been circling April 20 on their calendars as annual day of cannabis

B.C. communities await marine spill compensation years after incidents

The government maintains a Ship Source Oil Pollution Fund to compensate Canadians

RCMP say too early to know what happened in Broncos crash

RCMP Assistant Commissioner Curtis Zablocki said collission very complex

Conservative MP wants feds to close loophole for illegal border crossers

Immigration advocates call on government to suspend Canada-U.S. Safe Third Country Agreement

Alberta university criticized for honouring David Suzuki

University of Alberta plans to bestow environmentalist with honourary degree

Most Read