Coldest Night of the Year walk coming Feb. 26

Fundraiser helps support unsheltered people in community

Mayor Andy Adams with Diane Palmer (l-r) and Valery Puetz of CRNITS, as he proclaimed Feb. 26, 2022 ‘Coldest Night of the Year Day’ in Campbell River. Photo courtesy CRNITS.

Mayor Andy Adams with Diane Palmer (l-r) and Valery Puetz of CRNITS, as he proclaimed Feb. 26, 2022 ‘Coldest Night of the Year Day’ in Campbell River. Photo courtesy CRNITS.

The Campbell River and North Island Transition Society are once again bringing the Coldest Night of the Year fundraising walk to Campbell River, on February 26th.

This event helps bring understanding of what unsheltered individuals experience on a cold winter’s evening. It is a chance for residents to raise money while walking with others, as thousands do the same at over a hundred communities across Canada.

“We are looking for community teams, or individuals to join existing teams, to take part in this event that supports some of our communities most vulnerable people,” said Diane Palmer, economic development coordinator for the Campbell River and North Island Transition Society.

Participants who would like to walk with the Feb. 26 group can meet at the Rose Harbour parking lot, at 1116 Dogwood Street, between 4 and 5 p.m., with the walk starting at 5:15 p.m.

Parking will be available at nearby McElhanney Engineers and Land Surveyors (1196 Dogwood Street) or Dodds Furniture and Mattress (825 12th Avenue). Parking attendants will be on site.

There is also an option to participate virtually, for which Coldest Night of the Year tuques can be picked up in advance Feb. 19 to 26 at Transitions Thrift Store on 12th Avenue, open Tuesdays to Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

There is no registration fee this year. Visit www.cnoy.org/location/campbellriver to for registration and more information.

To reach their goal of $40,000, the society is looking for team captains to recruit seven or eight friends. The money raised will help furnish a brand-new Women’s Centre at CRNITS’s newest project, Eagle Harbour, to provide subsidized second-stage housing and permanent housing, for women and their children at risk of homelessness.

“More than 60 per cent of women accessing our Women’s Center are over 50 years old and are living in poverty, are homeless or at risk of homelessness,” Palmer said. “With this addition we will be offering women, with or without children, a continuum of support and the safety that comes with affordable and appropriate housing. Right now is the perfect opportunity to help provide the ‘comforts of home’ in this new build, as well as the addition of supports and services that are not eligible for grants or government funding.”

For a fun twist – Palmer and CRNITS executive director, Valery Puetz, have added a personal challenge this year. Whoever of the two raises the least amount will have to do their very own Polar Bear Swim after the event is over. Neither of them want to run into the freezing ocean, so they hope fundraising is a huge success.

READ ALSO: Campbell River Transition Society hosts moving vigil to recognize gender-based violence

Brain injury endemic among homeless populations: Vancouver research



sean.feagan@campbellrivermirror.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Campbell Riverfundraiser