B.C. Indigenous Relations Minister Scott Fraser speaks to community leaders from across the province at their annual “all chiefs” meeting in Vancouver, Nov. 6, 2019. (B.C. government)

B.C. provides $175M in reconciliation pact with Carrier Sekani

Fund helps develop forestry, culture for Indigenous communities

The B.C. government has signed a reconciliation agreement with seven Indigenous communities that will provide $175 million over five years to develop the forest industry, local economy and culture.

The “Pathways Forward 2.0” agreement provides the funds to members of the Carrier Sekani Tribal Council in the Prince George region of central B.C. The largest part is a five-year, $70 million economic development fund “to support business development, partnerships with neighbouring communities and joint ventures that will benefit the economy of the region as a whole,” Premier John Horgan announced Wednesday.

Other funds include:

• $40 million over five years to accommodate impacts from forest and range activities

• $25 million over five years for “capacity funding for implementing the agreement and continuing negotiations on a long-term, comprehensive agreement between the tribal council, provincial and federal governments

• $15 million “wealth fund” invested to generate revenues to support community growth

• $12.5 million over five years to revitalize Carrier and Sekani languages and culture

• $12.5 million over five years “to build on governance processes and structures, with a goal of self-government”

The seven Carrier Sekani First Nations are the Stellat’en First Nation, Nadleh Whut’en, Ts’il Kaz Koh First Nation (Burns Lake Band), Saik’uz First Nation, Nak’azdli Whut’en, Takla Nation and Tl’azt’en Nation.

RELATED: Carrier Sekani partner with UNBC for elder wellness

RELATED: UN rights becoming law in B.C., Horgan tells chiefs

Mayors of Prince George, Burns Lake and Vanderhoof welcomed the announcement, along with chiefs of the Indigenous communities.

“The Pathways Forward 2.0 Agreement is historic and marks the beginning of a positive co-operative relationship between B.C. and Carrier Sekani First Nations,” said Chief Priscilla Mueller of the Saik’uz First Nation. “The social-economic benefits to the Omineca region will be significant, and the message to all citizens should be that if First Nations prosper, then everyone prospers.”


@tomfletcherbc
tfletcher@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

BC legislature

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

SRD rejects ex-board member’s request to continue as Tlowitsis TAC representative

Area D director, Brenda Leigh, takes over as SRD’s representative after ex-Sayward mayor, John MacDonald’s exit

Music education remains important, especially during pandemic

‘Music really does lift people up in times of trial,’ says Sandowne music teacher

Local liquor store raising funds for food bank

On May 30, a portion of sales at JAK’s Beer Wine & Spirits will be donated to the food bank

A second wave of COVID-19 is probable, if history tells us anything

B.C.’s top doctor says that what health officials have learned this round will guide response in future

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the world in ways that would have… Continue reading

Mirror business directory and map

If you’d like to be added to the list, shoot us an email

Vancouver Island hasn’t seen a new homegrown case of COVID-19 in two weeks

Island’s low and steady transmission rate chalked up to several factors

Case of missing Vancouver Island woman inspires new true crime podcast

‘Island Crime’ Season 1 covers 2002 disappearance of Nanaimo’s Lisa Marie Young

B.C. mom’s drug-pricing petition on behalf of son garners thousands of signatures

Petition geared to gaining access to new medicines drew support of Chilliwack-Hope MP Mark Strahl

‘Paralyzed by fear’: B.C. woman details anxiety, grief at Italian relief hospital

Sheila Vicic spent two months in Italy as the country grappled with COVID-19

Dr. Bonnie Henry given new name in B.C. First Nation ceremony: ‘one who is calm among us’

The provincial health officer was honoured in a May 22 ceremony at elementary school in Hazelton

CAMH survey looks at binge-drinking, financial anxiety during COVID

Alcohol may be used as a coping mechanism for those whose careers may have been sidelined due to the pandemic

Most Read