Mike Davies/Campbell River Mirror General Manager Amanda Raleigh says the current renovations are mainly aesthetic. The heavy-lifting of the property’s rejuvenation process will take place after the upcoming, abbreviated golf season.

Campbell River Golf and Country Club making some big changes

Long-term plans include accomodation, wellness centre and a major course redesign

There are big things happening at the golf course on Peterson Road.

Sequoia Springs Golf Course was purchased by the Mailman family last month, and the new owners immediately got to work re-imagining what the property could be.

One of the first things they did was change the name. It’s now the Campbell River Golf and Country Club.

“We’re bringing it back to its roots, in a way,” says general manager Amanda Raleigh. The course originally held that name, she says, “many, many, many years ago, and we’re excited to be bringing it back.”

They wanted the term “country club” in the name, she says, “because golf is only going to be one facet of what we do here. We wanted a name that would encompass the many different areas and services we’re going to be providing. When you think of a ‘country club,’ you don’t just think ‘golf.’ You think of all the ammenities they’ll have.”

Some, however, hear the term “country club” and think about exclusion. They think about pretentious elitists.

“Sure, some picture that,” Raleigh admits, “but that’s not what this is. This isn’t the pretentious kind of country club. This isn’t your grandpa’s country club or the kind of country club you see on TV. This is a family environment that is inclusive and welcoming for everyone.”

The next thing they started on, after the name, was the clubhouse.

That’s right. That big, beautiful building sitting on the front of that property is getting ripped apart right now.

“Well, it’s not as drastic as it looks,” Raleigh says. “These are the minor renovations just to get ready for startup around the beginning of May.”

It’s looks like a lot of work, but it’s basically just cosmetic touch-ups: some gardening and a few coats of paint here and there, she says. They will then have an abbreviated golf season – May to the beginning of August – “and then we’ll shut down and do the major work on the property.”

That work will involve transforming the clubhouse into two full, separate restaurants – one casual and one fine-dining – and upstairs becoming a full banquet facility holding at least 200 people, but with the ability to section it into smaller rooms, as well.

But in order to do that, the pro shop needs to go.

“We’re putting the pro shop in its own, standalone building, the driving range will go in and we’ll be starting the redesign of the golf course itself.”

That redesign is being done by one of the premier golf course design firms in the country: Graham Cook &Associates. They are the team responsible for other B.C. gems such as Crown Isle just down the road in Courtenay, both Sun Rivers and The Dunes in Kamloops, The Harvest in Kelowna, Talking Rock in Chase and Shadow Mountain in Cranbrook, among others.

Yes, it’s an exciting time, Raleigh says.

“I’m relly excited. It seems like everyone’s really excited. I’ve heard a lot from the people in the neighbourhood – even those who aren’t golfers. All of the positive feedback we’ve been getting has been very, very encouraging.”

Long-term plans, Raleigh says, involve some kind of accomodations “and some kind of wellness centre.

Right now, however, they have to think mainly about short-term. Which means hiring for this upcoming season.

“We’re doing major hiring right now,” Raleigh says. “Everything from servers to hosts to cooks to dishwashers to bartenders to labourers and rock truck drivers and excavator operators.”

Anyone interested in any positions should email a resumé to info@crgolf.ca and Raleigh will forward them on to the people who need to see them.