An infographic released by the U.S. CDC in 2017 that outlines which types of facial hair work with face masks and respirators. (CDC)

Should you shave your beard to stop COVID-19? The U.S. CDC has a guide

Facial hair could be a big no-no if COVID-19 reaches pandemic status

Did you know your beard could be spreading the new coronavirus?

Well, according the U.S Centre for Disease Control (CDC), facial hair could be a big no-no if COVID-19 reaches pandemic status, as it’s widely expected to.

The CDC released an infographic showing what types of facial hair work with face masks and what kinds will not, although it originally did so in 2017 as part of a Movember notice.

READ MORE: Prepare for new coronavirus like an emergency, health minister advises

A clean-shaven look tops the list of acceptable facial hair types, of course, but some moustaches and soul patches also make the cut. Generally, the more hirsute, the less acceptable to the CDC.

The CDC-released list is extensive, with 36 types making the list. It includes some common facial hair types such as stubble, a goatee, mutton chops and pencil moustaches but also some more creative forms such as the Bandholz, the Zorro and the horseshoe. In case you’re wondering: stubble, Bandholz and mutton chops are not okay, but a short goatee, the Zorro and the pencil moustache are on CDC’s good list.

Although the CDC initially released the beard infographic in 2017 for workers who wear respiratory masks, it’s been making the rounds on Twitter on Thursday and people have some mixed opinions.

READ MORE: Canada’s 13th coronavirus case confirmed as husband of 12th patient


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

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