New realities of drinking, driving

The message is getting out that impaired driving is taboo

Count drinking and driving as another element of the 20th century’s car culture that’s been left behind in the 21st century.

Earlier this week the province made the obvious decision to keep tough rules introduced 10 months ago that have worked to curb the carnage caused by intoxicated drivers.

Across B.C., there have been 30 deaths in a seven month period that averaged 61 fatalities in each of the previous five years.

This is more than enough evidence to keep the laws as they are — there had been talk of easing the rules after bars and restaurants complained the laws were too harsh and hurt business. However, while this has been somewhat true, there has also been an evolution in how people think about their drink.

Whether switching from boozy beverages to mocktails or planning an alternative way to get home, the general public appears to have adapted to the new reality.

Part of this can be attributed to fear of getting caught, but hopefully it also signals a sea change in society. Younger generations have grown up being told about the dangers of drunk driving and their education has rubbed off on older citizens.

The glory days of gas guzzlers are long gone and city planners are more and more looking at ways to keep people out of their vehicles. Driving and drinking, once far too common, is also a relic of an past era. Taxis, bus service and even courtesy rides from good Samaratin organizations are now readily available for people who want to go out for a drink and get home without driving.

The message is clear: There are options to avoid hitting the road hammered. The law works and it’s time for all B.C. drivers to work with it.

– Black Press

Just Posted

Interest high in final all-candidates’ forum in Campbell River

As the campaign winds down, candidates make final push for votes Monday night

Campbell River supportive living facility celebrates 25 years amid housing crunch

Willow Point Supportive Living Society provides rental units to low-income seniors

‘Police are ready’ for legal pot, say Canadian chiefs

But Canadians won’t see major policing changes as pot becomes legal

Chili Fest raises funds for Campbell River community group

Jack-o’-lanterns take over Spirit Square during Halloween event

Campbell River RCMP catch youth with stolen handgun

Gun was allegedly stolen in break-and-enter on Dogwood St.

Rick Mercer says pot is ‘excruciatingly boring’

Comedian hopes Canadians will move onto something else once marijuana is legalized

A B.C. campaign to give municipalities input into marijuana advertising

Without a say, towns and cities risk Washington-State-style flood of advertising, proponent says

Defence cautions against mob justice in Calgary child neglect trial

Jennifer and Jeromie Clark of Calgary have pleaded not guilty to criminal negligence causing death

Feds eyeing options to expedite pardons for minor pot convictions

Internal discussions have focused on an application-based process for speeding up pot pardons

Island pot smokers won’t be allowed to light up on the ski hill

Mount Washington maintains smoke-free policy in light of marijuana legalization

U.S. pot firms urge Trump to dominate North American marijuana industry

Cannabis producers claim the U.S. is “rapidly losing” its competitive advantage to Canada

Battle resumes over speculation tax on B.C. vacant homes

Opposition calls it ‘fake’ tax that is reducing housing supply

Around the BCHL: Merritt, Chilliwack and Coquitlam early-season surprises

Around the BCHL is a look at what’s going on in the league and throughout the junior A world.

Federal government tables bill to transform prisoner segregation

Administrative and disciplinary segregation will be eliminated by Ottawa

Most Read