Loose dogs pose a threat

Letter: Writes expresses her frustration with dog owners who let their dogs run loose in the streets

I recently rescued a small dog from Victoria that was very anxious and not socialized to be with other dogs.

Since then, I have invested much time and money to see that he is trained to get along with others.

Needless to say, he is always leashed and is getting better at sitting and staying down when other dogs pass.

Where it gets stressful for both of us, however, is when thoughtless dog owners feel it is okay to allow their dog off-leash and run free in the neighbourhood I walk in.

Tonight my dog and I were approached by an uncontrolled and unsupervised large dog as it ran towards us.

All I could do was pick up my dog while I watched the owner working on his car oblivious of the scene.

Two blocks later, nearing my house, another thoughtless woman, allowing her two large dogs to wander unleashed outside her house, watched as one bounded towards my dog and I.

Again, I had to pick him up and yell, scream, and swing at the dog in front of us, while the woman slowly made her way to us (due to the fact this dog wasn’t trained to recall). Without a word to me, she gathered her dog and walked away.

No, wait, she did have a few words for me…but they were far from apologetic.

This was just tonight. I have weekly, if not daily, experiences similar to these and I’m getting very frustrated.

I understand the desire to have your dog off leash, but if you cannot control him (i.e. have 100% recall – that means your dog comes when you call him every time), do not allow him to wander the streets…please!

Not only is it not safe for others, but it is not safe for your dog.

There are people (and other dogs) who do not appreciate having a strange, large dog in their face and I don’t give a crap if he’s friendly (as I’m always reassured of when this happens).

For all the dog owners reading this that feel you aren’t hurting anyone allowing your large, yet friendly, dog bound uncontrolled towards people walking by, think of those that are frightened by dogs.

Think of the young children that may not know how to protect themselves from your dog.

Why should this be a threat while they walk through their neighbourhoods?

 

Kathi Cameron

Campbell River