Keep debates civil

Mind your manners when discussing the issues

With the upcoming municipal elections, which are shaping up to be the most contentious and prickly of the past decade, there will undoubtedly be a number of loud, and likely, disrespectful voices being raised.

While this is no different than most years, why does it have to be this way?

Call it naive, but we believe it’s possible to have a debate about important issues without the language and rhetoric descending to a schoolyard level.

There have beenmany contentious issues during the term of this council and people have strong feelings about them.

Strong feelings are acceptable, strong language isn’t.

No one runs for public office expecting to please everyone, and for there to be nothing but nice discussions, framed within the rules of good behaviour.

The lead-up to the election promises to be rife with pot shots, and some may be well deserved.

But there is a limit, and what any right-thinking individual should object to is the language used to express this discontent.

While some will argue their anger with councillors and the mayor is just and has prompted them to act in this less-than-polite manner, and is therefore permissible, we disagree.

Use the manners we were taught as children. Nothing is gained by acting and speaking boorishly or derisively, or stooping to using personal attacks.

This group of politicians, like all the others in this province, will have to stand on their individual and collective records on Nov. 19, and the public will judge them with votes.

– Black Press