Cartoon advocates violent, if not hostile behaviour

Depiction of protester accosted by pot-banger advocates suppression of freedom of speech

LETTERS

I’m a 70-year-old, 25-year resident of Campbell River and I’m very concerned about your “political cartoon” in the paper on Wednesday, Sept. 22.

The cartoon has two distinct sides. The first side shows a woman reading a paper that says “Exhausted hospital staff disheartened and demoralized by anti-vax protests.”

In the bubble above her it says, “Hmmm, it’s been a while since I banged pots and pans in support of hospital workers…time to start up again.”

The second side of the cartoon shows this woman’s response which shows her with two pots and she has them right in the face of a protester carrying a sign “Stop the medical tyranny.” His shirt says “My body, my choice.”

We see seven “bang, bang, bang, bang, bang, bang, bangs” which obliterate his face. He is accosted, if not assaulted, the suggestion in no uncertain terms is that it’s justified behavior.

I believe differently.

I think the 7 p.m. pot and pan banging in support of health workers was brilliant and believe no one should be harassed when trying to get to a hospital for care or to work but these things have no connection to the act shown on the second side of the cartoon.

Dissent and protest are one of the bedrocks of democracy.

Don’t forget that Black people, First Nations people and oh, women, were not able to vote and the majority of people believed that to be correct. Gay people were not equals under the law.

We have evolved over our history in Canada because people worked against the tide, carried signs, lobbied tirelessly. To suggest in any way that it’s okay to squelch freedom of expression or dissent is beyond dangerous.

This cartoon literally made my legs so weak. My first response was sadness, followed by anger. in that brief anger phase I thought what if I went to the Mirror office and showed my displeasure at your cartoon and banged pots under somebody’s chin seven times. It would be rightfully considered a violent, or at least, hostile act. I’d never do it.

Don McClean,

Campbell River

Campbell River