Yucalta resident worried about staffing

Denise Glover suffers from multiple sclerosis and, with her body shutting down, lives full-time at Yucalta Lodge, where she says she is not getting the services she needs.

  • Jun. 2, 2011 3:00 p.m.

Denise Glover suffers from multiple sclerosis and, with her body shutting down, lives full-time at Yucalta Lodge, where she says she is not getting the services she needs.

Glover, 52, is in a wheelchair, can’t sit up on her own and is often paralyzed by body spasms. A few months ago she moved to Yucalta, a residential care facility, after the crippling disease  progressed to the point where her family could no longer take care of her on their own.

As part of Glover’s care at Yucalta, she is supposed to receive physiotherapy to help with her condition but now nearly three months into her stay, Glover said she has yet to receive any such service.

“I was told they have physio here but I haven’t received any,” said Glover. “When my body’s in spasms I can’t move so it’s time consuming for the care attendants and they don’t have a lot of time because there’s not enough staff on the floor.”

Glover figures every shift could benefit from just one extra staff person. She says just to move her alone takes two people.

“VIHA (Vancouver Island Health Authority) needs to put more money into the system for more care workers,” said Glover.

Val Wilson, spokesperson for VIHA, which operates Yucalta, said there is no need for extra staff, and the amount of workers at Yucalta is sufficient.

“There are no staffing shortages at Yucalta,” said Wilson. “The residential staffing model at Yucalta is consistent with all VIHA-funded residential care sites and is guided by the provincial community care licensing branch.”

As well, both physiotherapy and occupational therapy services are available at Yucalta.

Wilson said residents are assessed and provided with those services based on need. Each resident also has a care plan that is updated as necessary to ensure the resident is receiving the appropriate care.

“We are aware that this individual has voiced concerns to care staff and care staff is working with the resident to ensure concerns are addressed,” said Wilson.

Glover admits she has inquired about physio and said the nurses have been working on a plan for her.

Glover is hopeful she will see some progress soon, but in the meantime wants to let others know what it’s like in a care facility.

“I want to bring awareness to the community of what kind of things you’ll be dealing with when you need care,” she said. Sometimes it can be very lonely and Glover said she’ll turn the TV on in her room so it sounds like there are other people around. She often is alone at mealtimes because she is afraid of catching the flu from other residents if she eats in the cafeteria.

Glover was first diagnosed with MS at the age of 28 after complaining of blackouts and double vision. When she was still healthy, she put in countless hours of volunteer work with the MS Society of Canada, helped with Access Awareness Day events and attended meetings at City Hall.

Three years ago, when her family could no longer provide the care she needed, Glover ended up in hospital in Victoria before being brought back to Campbell River. She was originally transferred to New Horizons, where Glover said she was happy.

“I wanted to be at New Horizons because I could get downtown and have a life again,” said Glover. “I could go to Ricky’s for breakfast with my grandma and see the fireworks again in the summer.”

But just three months into her stay, Glover fell sideways off a curb in her wheelchair and landed on her side, fracturing her right hip. After the accident, she was moved to Yucalta. Glover said she enjoys the people at Yucalta and feels safe there but is tired of waiting for the help she so badly wants.

Wilson said VIHA takes complaints like Glover’s “very seriously” and nurses at Yucalta will be addressing Glover’s situation.

Just Posted

28 townhouses on the way to 525 Dogwood

Council approves latest phase of development, but not before expressing traffic concerns

Diver discovers possible historic anchor off Campbell River

The rusted, barnacle-encrusted anchor was wedged into the bottom off Quadra Island… Continue reading

Cold weather puts pressure on homeless shelters in Campbell River

Salvation Army and Sobering Centre offer a total of 40 beds

SRD chair, CAO to respond to 32 letters from Cortes Island

Board votes for responses in light of delegations being turned down

Back to school for Vancouver Island’s snow-covered kids, more snow coming

All school districts in business this morning but officials warn another 5-10 centimetres today

B.C. students win Great Waters Challenge video contest

Video, mural and song about saving the salmon claims the top prize

Northern B.C. First Nation clan says ancient tools found at pipeline work site

Archeologists from the Smithsonian Institute estimate one of the stones found dates back up to 3500 years

Ontario police field complaints over Amber Alert for missing girl, 11, found dead

Some said the Amber Alert issued late Thursday for Riya Rajkumar disrupted their sleep

Names keep adding to vaccine petition started by B.C. mom

Maple Ridge mom started campaign to make vaccination a condition of attending school

Wilson-Raybould resignation stokes anger, frustration within veterans community

Liberals have had three veterans-affairs ministers — Kent Hehr, Seamus O’Regan and Wilson-Raybould

No Center of Gravity festival in Kelowna this summer: organizers

COG organizers said the hope is to return to the Okanagan in 2020

Plecas won’t run in next election if B.C. legislature oversight reforms pass

B.C. Speaker and Abbotsford South MLA says he feels ‘great sympathy’ for Jody Wilson-Raybould

Workshop with ‘accent reduction’ training cancelled at UBC

The workshop was cancelled the same day as an email was sent out to international students

Most Read