(The Weather Network)

Wet weather expected for much of coastal B.C.

The Weather Network is calling for up to 200mm of rain to fall in some areas of the South Coast and Vancouver Island

Enjoy any blue sky you can find because it will soon turn cloudy as up to 200mm of rain is expected to fall along the South Coast and Vancouver Island between now and the end of the week.

Starting Tuesday, meteorologists at The Weather Network are calling for heavy rains across the Coastal Mountains, West Vancouver Island and the Squamish region. This excessive rainfall is expected to melt the already existing snow at an accelerated rate, causing rivers to run high and increase the risk of avalanches and landslides as the snowpack becomes unstable.

(Video by Curtis Kreklau)

The rain showers are being caused by a deep layer of tropical moisture that will usher in milder air, and with it, rain. As freezing levels rise — the point where falling snow turns to rain — many of the typically snowy ski hills will instead see rainfall beginning on Tuesday.

There are no major storms expected this week, but an unsettling pattern will continue into Saturday and Sunday. Temperatures will become above seasonal, but snow levels will drop back to normal levels of between 1200-1500 metres.

Looking further into the forecast for the 2017/18 Winter season, Canadians should expect a wild ride, says Chief Meteorologist Chris Scott

“It’s safe to say we’ll all be participating in winter this year.”

British Columbia is expected to see near normal temperatures in most areas, with the winter chill biting into those residents living in the eastern portion of the province. Overall, officials say this winter will not be as persistent or as severe as it was last year, especially for areas near the coast. They also expect the extended periods of cold weather to be more likely to happen during the second half of the winter season, with milder conditions through the end of 2017.

For anyone hoping for an early Spring, previous years showing these similar global weather patterns — such as a developing La Niña — typically means that spring does not come early.



ragnar.haagen@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

 

(The Weather Network)

Just Posted

Campbell River teen on the mend a year later

Jonah Shankar’s treatment for brain tumour involved trips to UK

Monkey spotted on late-night jaunt in Campbell River

Conservation officers also apparently looking for cougar in the area

Community profiles show social determinants of health

Reports depict life in Campbell River and other Strathcona communities

‘Free Willy’ bill to end whale captivity supported by MP Blaney

Blaney says law would have died without efforts by New Democrat MPs

VIDEO: Pickup truck smashes into Campbell River home

No injuries reported in Friday morning incident

10 facts about Father’s Day

Did you know that the special day for dads was first celebrated in 1910?

B.C. VIEWS: When farmland protection doesn’t protect farmers

Secondary residences aren’t mansions, families tell Lana Popham

Bombers down B.C. Lions 33-23 in season opener

Former Lion Andrew Harris leads Winnipeg with 148 rushing yards

Northern B.C. family remembers murdered Indigenous woman with memorial walk

Still no closure for Ramona Wilson’s family 25 years later

B.C. university to offer mentorship program for former youth in care

Students using the provincial tuition waiver program will soon be able to form a community at KPU

Cyclists competing in one of the toughest bike races on the planet pass through Fernie

Divide riders looking strong as they finish first leg of 4160 km race

You might not know these B.C. records are public

Hired a lawyer to file a civil claim? Those are published online

B.C. bus driver loses case to get job back after texting while driving full bus

An arbitator ruled that Tim Wesman’s phone usage was a “a reckless disregard for public safety”

Revamped B.C. Lions set to battle veteran Winnipeg Blue Bombers

The Lions’ first test of the season will be a big one

Most Read