Ten people were killed and 16 injured on April 23, 2018, when a man drove a rented van down a busy sidewalk on Yonge Street in north Toronto. (The Canadian Press)

‘We will not be broken,’ Toronto mayor says on deadly van attack anniversary

Mayor says the city will never forget those who died and were injured that day

The second anniversary of the deadly van attack in Toronto is even more difficult this year due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the recent shooting rampage in Nova Scotia, Toronto Mayor John Tory said Thursday.

The mayor started a day of virtual commemoration for the 10 people killed and 16 injured on April 23, 2018, when a man drove a rented van down a busy sidewalk on Yonge Street in north Toronto.

“We will not be broken,” Tory said live on YouTube. “Let us take inspiration, both from those we lost, and from the heroes who responded to the tragedy, as we rise to the challenges of today.”

A local community group will host a virtual vigil Thursday night rather than gathering at the site of the attack, and Tory has asked mourners to avoid gathering or placing flowers and other items near the site.

Shortly after his arrest two years ago, Alek Minassian told police he committed the attack for retribution against society after being shunned by women for years.

The judge overseeing the trial, which has been delayed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, said it will turn on Minassian’s state of mind — not whether he carried out the attack.

Tory said the city will never forget those who died and were injured that day.

READ MORE: Witnesses still struggling one year after deadly Yonge Street van attack in Toronto

Ten lit candles, representing those who died, will be placed in the mayor’s office window to face toward the city hall square, where the flags will be lowered to half-mast and the Toronto sign dimmed to honour the victims.

Ji Hun Kim, So He Chung, Geraldine Brady, Chul Min Kang, Anne Marie Victoria D’Amico, Mary Elizabeth Forsyth, Munir Abdo Habib Najjar, Dorothy Marie Sewell, Andrea Bradden and Beutis Renuka Amarasingha died that day.

“I know that can make it more difficult for some to bear,” Tory said. ”That will not stop us from remembering all the lives that were lost on April 23, 2018.”

He said the city is also mourning the loss of life after a shooting rampage in Nova Scotia left 22 people dead.

“This year is especially difficult for many people as we experience as a nation another senseless act of violence and loss of life in our sister province of Nova Scotia,” he said.

“We continue to mourn with the residents Nova Scotia and I want them to know that Toronto is with you during this time and will continue to support you in any way that we can.”

Liam Casey, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Local liquor store raising funds for food bank

On May 30, a portion of sales at JAK’s Beer Wine & Spirits will be donated to the food bank

A second wave of COVID-19 is probable, if history tells us anything

B.C.’s top doctor says that what health officials have learned this round will guide response in future

City of Campbell River re-opening most park amenities and outdoor washrooms

Splash park, playgrounds, sports fields, outdoor volleyball courts, indoor facilities not yet

First Nation’s guardians ‘take matters into their own hands’ and organize environmental clean-up

Mamalilikulla guardians step up to clear abandoned boats after no response from natural resource officers

LIVE: Procession to honour Snowbirds Capt. Jennifer Casey comes to Halifax

Snowbirds service member died in a crash in Kamloops one week ago

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the world in ways that would have… Continue reading

Mirror business directory and map

If you’d like to be added to the list, shoot us an email

Bike shops busier than ever, but owners worry about stock supply issues

Uptick in cyclists brings new challenges for shops

RCMP facing ‘systemic sustainability challenges’ due to provincial policing role

Provinces, territories and municipalities pay anywhere from 70 to 90 per cent of the cost of the RCMP’s services

One man dead after standoff with Chilliwack RCMP

The Independent Investigations Office of B.C. is investigating the RCMP’s role in the death

B.C. employers worry about safety, cash flow, second wave in COVID-19 restart

A survey found 75 per cent of businesses worry about attracting customers

Ex-BC Greens leader Andrew Weaver says province came close to early election

Disagreement centred on the LNG Canada project in northern B.C.

Canada’s NHL teams offer options to season-ticket holders

Canadian teams are offering refunds, but also are pushing a number of incentives to let them keep the money

Most Read