Judith Sayers, elected president of the Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council, has been appointed to the Order of Canada. She is one of 125 recipients in 2017. SUBMITTED PHOTO

Vancouver Island Indigenous leaders appointed to Order of Canada

Judith Sayers, Chief Robert Joseph both named officers to the Order

Judith Sayers, president of the Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council in Port Alberni and a member of the Hupacasath First Nation, has been named an officer to the Order of Canada.

Sayers is one of two people on Vancouver Island to be honoured with the Order of Canada; she was recognized for her contributions to advancing clean energy projects in her community and for her role as a champion of sustainable development in Indigenous communities. Chief Robert Joseph, of Alert Bay, B.C., hereditary chief of Gwawaenuk First Nation, was named an officer of the Order of Canada for his distinguished pan-Canadian leadership as a voice for reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people.

For Sayers, who has been outspoken about many First Nations rights and resource issues, accepting the Order of Canada brought on a mix of emotions. “Our relationship with Canada is not always a good one,” she said. “It is an honour to be in a crowd of accomplished people. Am I really part of Canada, when we haven’t been able to resolve our issues with the government?

“At the same time, we’re trying to relationship build. I think back when Queens University offered me an honorary doctorate (in the early 1990s). To be an elder is the highest honour. I asked my elders whether I should accept this honour.” Their reply was yes, as it would give her credibility as she continued with her career.

Sayers said in the end, receiving the Order of Canada adds to her credibility as an Indigenous leader. “I’m hoping it’s going to open more doors for me that I can use to help advance the issues, our rights as First Nations people,” she said. “That maybe more people will listen to me and sit down and talk, negotiate, and settle with us.”

There were 125 people from across Canada honoured with the Order of Canada by Governor General Julie Payette on Dec. 29, including 10 others from Vancouver, Surrey and Burnaby in British Columbia.

Created in 1967, the Order of Canada, one of our country’s highest civilian honours, recognizes outstanding achievement, dedication to the community and service to the nation.

Sayers and Joseph were two of several Indigenous leaders who were appointed to the Order of Canada this time, and Sayers said that’s a good sign. “It’s recognition that Indigenous people play an important part of making Canada what it is today,” she said.

Indigenous people are making change in different ways. For Fred Sasakamoose of the Ahtahkakoop Cree Nation in Saskatchewan, it was being the first Indigenous player in the National Hockey League. For Jeanette Corbiere Lavell of Wikwemikong, Ont., Sayers noted, it is how she has made advancements with women and women’s status.

“Letting these kinds of issues play a part in appointments helps to educate Canadians on what kind of work needs to be done, what kind of work has been done and where we go from here.”

editor@albernivalleynews.com

 

Just Posted

Dippity doo-dah; Campbell River Rotary Duck Dip winners scooped up

Fundraiser for Head Injury Support Society’s Linda’s Place

BC Hydro to pulse water flows down the Elk Falls Canyon to accommodate fish passage

First pulse is today and tomorrow; Hydro warns people to be cautious upstream of Elk Falls

Union says mediated negotiation with WFP has been ‘disappointing’

Striking forestry workers have been on picket lines since Canada Day

The conflicting ideas of economy and ecology examined in Ellingsen’s work

Artist talk for photographic exhibition The Last Stand is part of this weekend’s Art & Earth Festival

Yearbook photo surfaces of Trudeau wearing ‘brownface’ costume in 2001

The report describes the occasion as an ‘Arabian Nights’-themed gala event

B.C. ‘tent city’ disputes spark call for local government autonomy

UBCM backs Maple Ridge after province overrules city

B.C. drug dealers arrested after traffic stop near Banff turns into helicopter pursuit

Antonio Nolasco-Padia, 23, and Dina Anthony, 55, both well-known to Chilliwack law enforcement

B.C. MLA calls on province to restrict vaping as first related illness appears in Canada

Todd Stone, Liberal MLA for Kamloops-South Thompson, introduced an anti-vaping bill in April

Chilliwack woman wins right to medically assisted death after three-year court battle

Julia Lamb has been the lead plaintiff in a legal battle to ease restrictions on Canada’s assisted dying laws

B.C. bus crash survivor petitions feds to fix road where classmates died

UVic student’s petition well over halfway to 5k signature goal

NDP, Liberals promise more spending, while Tories promise spending cuts

Making life more affordable for Canadians a focus in the 2019 election

UPDATE: Police probe third threat against a Kamloops high school in eight days

Police have not released any further details into what the threat includes

Most Read