The City of Campbell River is looking for ideas on how to address problems in the community using data and connected technologies in an attempt to win a piece of a $75-million prize pool from Infrastructure Canada.

The City of Campbell River pursues multi-million dollar infrastructure prize

And it’s looking for ideas to win a piece of a $75-million prize pool from Infrastructure Canada

The City of Campbell River has decided to put its name forward to try and win part of a $75-million prize pool from Infrastructure Canada to implement “smart green initiatives.”

The Smart Cities Challenge is an Infrastructure Canada initiative that challenges communities across the country to “use data and connected technologies to address their most pressing problems by encouraging technology innovation,” according to the report presented to council at its last meeting.

“Communities of all sizes across Canada still face challenges that traditional solutions have failed to solve,” the contest states. “How can we improve how we move around, earn a living, create safety and security, protect our environment, learn, live and play?”

The winning communities will receive either $5 million or $10 million – depending on their size – to implement their ideas. One grand prize of $50 million will also be awarded.

The city feels it already has a leg up on much of the competition with the recent implementation of CR Advantage, the city-owned fibre optic network, installed last year. However, before they can pitch to Infrastructure Canada how they will address problems within the community should they win the contest, they need to know what you think the problems are.

They have launched a website (connect.campbellriver.ca) asking for ideas from the public on how the city can use technology and data “to build a brighter future for our community.”

On the site, there are sections to submit ideas, tell your stories about your experiences or complete a simple anonymous survey.

The city will also be hosting an open house information session and discussion with the public on Thursday, March 1 in the lobby of City Hall from 4:30 to 6 p.m.