Among the 10 volunteers to donated their time was Chris Clements, who dug tree plants with his son Edwin. Photo Edward Hitchins/Campbell River Mirror

TD Tree Days takes over Baikie Island

Event part of pledge by Canadian bank to plant one million new trees and shrubs

It was a wet, muddy, and overcast mid-November day, but for people like Camille Andrews, the soil around the edges of Baikie Island Nature Reserve was perfect.

“We are hoping to have a great turnout,” said the Habitat Management coordinator of Greenways Land Trust, who oversaw the tree planting event as part of Tree Days, presented by TD Bank. “Our end goal is to plant up to and including 700 trees, native to the soil and landscape here.”

As part of the Ready Commitment started by the nation’s second largest financial institution, the TD Tree Days program commenced 12 years ago, in 2010. The City of Campbell River also assists in funding for these events, as well as the Fish and Wildlife Compensation program. These events have been hosted at Baikie Island since then.

“Last time, we only had a couple volunteers come,” Andrews says with a laugh. “We are hoping for a better turnout today.”

The crew was small and mighty and the 10 volunteers who braved the slushy, muddy conditions had a grand time out in nature. The crew also dug out Sitka spruce infected with white pine weevil in order to make the room necessary for the plants and shrubs.

READ MORE: 300 trees planted at Baikie Island Nature Preserve for TD Tree Days

It also spanned generations as well. April Rikers, a local woman who is a frequent volunteer at these events, brought some help: her granddaughter, Sierra.

“She’s the best little helper,” said Rikers, while the three year old ran about picking up empty pots the native plants were housed in, before being brought to their new spot in the ground surrounding Baikie Island.

Andrew Burger, who volunteered with his two children, Freya and Eli, said the exercise is encouraging to promote a green world.

“Not only is this a great exercise for mental health, it also helps the children become better stewards as well.” said Burger.

If you missed out and are interested in volunteering, you can find out more information by emailing Greenways Land trust at volunteer@greenwaystrust.ca.


Edward Hitchins
edward.hitchins@campbellrivermirror.com

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Camille Andrews of Greenways Land Trust digs a hole for a new tree bed, while Eli Burger looks on. Photo Edward Hitchins/Campbell River Mirror.

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