Premier John Horgan during a 2018 meeting with Washington Gov. Jay Inslee. (Black Press Media file)

Should B.C. get rid of Daylight Saving Time?

The province wants to know, as state governments down south make the move

Shall B.C. forever “spring forward” and “fall back”?

That is the question at the heart of a provincial survey open to the public until July 19.

“As our neighbours in the western United States move toward permanent daylight saving time, it’s a good time to think about what will work best for British Columbia,” said Premier John Horgan in a news release on Monday. “I invite people to consider our options and take part in an online survey that will help us decide whether to leave things as they are or if it’s time to make a change.”

RELATED: B.C. offers to work with U.S. states on daylight saving time

The survey includes information on B.C.’s history of time observance and the impact of various options, such as changes to the timing of sunrise and sunset at different times of year and the impact on industries such as agriculture and transportation.

The survey takes about five minutes to complete. Residents can also submit written submissions.

Horgan has said he has written to the governors of California, Oregon and Washington, where legislators are considering bills that would seek an exemption from U.S. federal law so they can opt out of turning the clocks back an hour each fall and then ahead in the spring.

READ MORE: B.C. MLA calls for daylight saving time to stay

ONLINE POLL: Would you like to move away from time changes?

The premier has described the seasonal time change as the number one issue over which the public has contacted him since taking the job in 2017.


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

wolfgang.depner@saanichnews.com

Just Posted

PHOTOS: Sold-out crowd enjoys BCHL game at the Brindy

Alberni Valley Bulldogs beat Trail Smoke Eaters 5-2

Campbell River RCMP officer assaulted during traffic stop

Officer expected to make a full recovery; had been conducting impaired driving investigation alone

Campbell River hydro project workers pitch a perfect safety game

The billion dollar price tag is not the only astonishing number

PHOTOS: More than 40 people gather for pro-choice rally

Event was planned to coincide with pro-abortion speaker Denise Mountenay presentation

Cold, stormy winter forecast across much of Canada, The Weather Network predicts

In British Columbia temperatures will be slightly above normal and precipitation will be just below normal

‘Midget’ no more: Sweeping division name changes coming to minor hockey in Canada

Alpha-numeric division names will be used for the 2020-2021 season and beyond

Ottawa urges CN and union to continue talks as 3,200 workers go on strike

The rail workers began their strike after failing to reach a deal by a midnight deadline

Trans Mountain received $320M in government subsidies in first half 2019: report

The money included $135.8 million in direct subsidies and $183.8 million in indirect subsidies

Student tells B.C. Supreme Court she wasn’t allowed to leave indigenous smudging ceremony

Girl cross-examined Monday in Nanaimo courtroom, case continues Tuesday

UPDATED: Vancouver Island’s Joe gets suspended sentence in Teddy the dog cruelty case

Melissa Tooshley expected in court on Thursday in same case

Nineteen boats carrying invasive mussels stopped at B.C. borders

Waters of Columbia-Shuswap still test mussel-free

Woman ‘horrified’ after being told to trek 200 kilometres home from Kamloops hospital

‘I can’t get from Kamloops back to 100 Mile House injured, confused… no shoes, no clothes whatsoever’

Sentencing scheduled Tuesday for man who killed Belgian tourist

Sean McKenzie pleaded guilty to second-degree murder of 28-year-old Amelie Sakkalis near Boston Bar

Most Read