Police line do not cross tape background. (Black Press Media files)

Man sentenced to 7.5 years for ‘unquestionably horrific’ Coquitlam bus stop assault

Tyrel William Scott offered Cody Cardiff a cigarette, then stabbed him twice

A Maple Ridge man will spend 7.5 years in jail for a bus stop stabbing in Coquitlam eight years ago.

A judge at provincial court in Port Coquitlam sentence Tyrel William Scott to 7.5 years in jail after he stabbed Cody Cardiff on Dec. 15, 2011.

Court documents from Oct. 28 state Cardiff, then 20, had been busing home at about 2 a.m. after visiting a friend in Surrey. He got off the bus at the Coquitlam Centre bus loop, and so did Scott, who had been on the same bus.

Scott walked up to Cardiff and offered him a cigarette before pulling out a knife and stabbing Cardiff twice in the torso. He left the scene before police arrived.

Court document said the “attack was entirely unprovoked and apparently without any motive,” and Scott did not know Cardiff.

When police arrived, the found Cardiff covered in blood, bleeding from two stab wounds in the chest and stomach area. Documents state he went into full cardiac arrest and went into surgery that cut through his sternum to repair his hear, liver and diaphragm. His lung collapsed a few days later, but he recovered and was released from hospital on Dec. 24.

At the scene of the attack, Mounties brought in a police dog that found a hoodie and a toque that had Scott’s DNA on it. The dog also found a knife with Cardiff’s blood on it.

Scott was not identified till February 2012 when police held a press conference and released images and videos. He was identified by the public shortly after that but Scott was not charged until mid-2017 following a “Mr. Big” operation.

Police had begun targeting Scott in March 2017 via an undercover operation to find evidence to connect him to the attack on Cardiff. On June 29, 2017, police had enough evidence for Crown to charge him.

In a victim impact statement, Cardiff stated the attacked was a near-death experience.

“His self-image has been affected and he is constantly reminded of the horrific night of the attack anytime his shirt does not hide the entire scar or he is asked how he got the scar,” court documents state. “More than six years after the attack, he continues to suffer from nerve pain that sends shooting spasms through his upper body.”

Justice R.P. McQuillan called the attack “unquestionably horrific.”

Cardiff now panics when he is a in big group of strangers and has been forced to finance a car so he can get around. He also lost $20,000 because he wasn’t able to get a refund for the school program he was attending at the time of the attack.

While police officers were conducting their undercover operation, they found multiple illegal firearms, date rape drug GHB, 11 grams of hash oil and $2,400 of dried marijuana.

At a separate time, Scott was found to have 25 grams of fentanyl, 4.43 grams of methamphetamine, 1.3 grams of MDMA, an additional 77 grams of marijuana and $905 in cash.

A secondary search revealed that the bulge in his crotch area was a fanny pack containing $12,715 in cash.

In deciding on the sentence length, McQuillan took into account a troubled home life while Scott was growing up. Court documents state he had “significant behaviour challenges.” He was expelled in Grade 10 for fighting and truancy. He was sexually abused at age 12 and has been diagnosed with PTSD as a result.

Scott began drinking alcohol at age 13, using cannabis and cocaine at age 15, had overdose on fentanyl three times and hasbeen selling drugs since 2005.

Scott has a lengthy rap sheet which began in 2004, when he was 26, and has accumulate 39 previous convictions.

McQuillan said although the total sentence for Scott’s firearms, drug trafficking and assault convictions was 14 years and five months, in his view that would be “unduly harsh, crushing and disproportionate and may have the effect of discouraging rehabilitation.”

McQuillan sentenced Scott to 11 years, which was reduced to 7.5 after years of pre-sentence custody.

ALSO READ: TransLink to cancel 16 SeaBus sailings due to job action

ALSO READ: Victim named in Halloween night homicide near Cultus Lake


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

The City of Campbell River sits on the shore of Discovery Passage and is back by the mountains of central Vancouver Island and Strathcona Park.
Funding available for downtown Campbell River building safety changes

Funding is available for property owners and business operators interested in changing… Continue reading

The Klahoose First Nation village on Cortes Island is under lockdown until at least Dec. 7 due to a positive COVID-19 test. Photo courtesy Kevin Peacey.
Klahoose First Nation’s COVID-19 response working

Community testing comes back negative after week of lock down

Campbell River’s emergency shelter is opening again on Dec. 4, 2020. (SUSAN QUINN/ Alberni Valley News)
Campbell River Emergency shelter opens today

20 of 22 beds available due to COVID restrictions

BC Ambulance Services reassures people that the service is well staffed and ready to respond. Photo by Don Bodger
BC Ambulance assures the community they’re ‘fully staffed’

‘Paramedics are not limited to a geographical area.’ — BCEHS

British Columbia provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry wears a face mask as she views the Murals of Gratitude exhibition in Vancouver, on Friday, July 3, 2020. Dr. Henry frequently reminds people that there are those people who cannot wear a mask for legitimate reasons and they don’t have to. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Not everyone can wear a mask, Campbell River woman wants community to keep in mind

People enforcing mask rules frequently ignore that possibility

Pickleball game in Vancouver on Sunday, November 8, 2020. B.C.’s public health restrictions for COVID-19 have been extended to adult team sports, indoors and outside. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
711 more COVID-19 cases detected in B.C. Friday

‘Virus is not letting up and neither can we’

Demonstrators, organized by the Public Fishery Alliance, outside the downtown Vancouver offices of Fisheries and Oceans Canada July 6 demand the marking of all hatchery chinook to allow for a sustainable public fishery while wild stocks recover. (Public Fishery Alliance Facebook photo)
Angry B.C. anglers see petition tabled in House of Commons

Salmon fishers demand better access to the healthy stocks in the public fishery

Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

(Hotel Zed/Flytographer)
B.C. hotel grants couple 18 years of free stays after making baby on Valentines Day

Hotel Zed has announced a Kelowna couple has received free Valentines Day stays for next 18 years

Farmers raise slogans during a protest on a highway at the Delhi-Haryana state border, India, Thursday, Dec. 3, 2020. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau rejected the diplomatic scolding Canada’s envoy to India received on Friday for his recent comments in support of protesting Indian farmers. Tens of thousands of farmers have descended upon the borders of New Delhi to protest new farming laws that they say will open them to corporate exploitation. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Manish Swarup
Trudeau brushes off India’s criticism for standing with farmers in anti-Modi protests

The High Commission of India in Ottawa had no comment when contacted Friday

Nurse Kath Olmstead prepares a shot as the world’s biggest study of a possible COVID-19 vaccine, developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc., gets underway Monday, July 27, 2020, in Binghamton, N.Y. U.S. biotech firm Moderna says its vaccine is showing signs of producing lasting immunity to COVID-19, and that it will have as many as many as 125 million doses available by the end of March. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Hans Pennink
Canada orders more COVID vaccines, refines advice on first doses as cases reach 400K

Canada recorded its 300,000th case of COVID-19 on Nov. 16

Apartments are seen lit up in downtown Vancouver as people are encouraged to stay home during the global COVID-19 pandemic on Thursday, Dec. 3, 2020. British Columbia’s deputy provincial health officer says provincewide data show the most important area B.C. must tackle in its response to the COVID-19 pandemic is health inequity. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Marissa Tiel
Age, income among top factors affecting well-being during pandemic, B.C. survey shows

Among respondents earning $20,000 a year or less, more than 41 per cent reported concern about food insecurity

Victoria-based driving instructors are concerned for their own and the community’s safety with the continued number of residents from COVID hotspots in the Lower Mainland coming to the city to take their driving road tests. (Black Press Media file photo)
Students from COVID hotspots travel to Vancouver Island for driving tests

Union leader calls on government to institute stronger travel ban

The opening day on Mount Washington this year was Dec. 4. Screenshot
Mount Washington opens on time, COVID-19 protocols in place

“We’re super excited - it’s been six months in the planning.”

Most Read