The Mountain Retreat Hotel & Suites in Squamish is owned by Coastal Hospitality. Google street view

Lawsuit claims B.C. hockey players caused $200,000 in damage to Squamish hotel

Coastal Hospitality is suing the Abbotsford Minor Hockey Association, a coach, players and parents

Abbotsford hockey players caused more than $200,000 in damage to the Mountain Retreat Hotel & Suites in Squamish when they kicked or pushed an ice machine and ruptured a water line, according to a lawsuit from the hotel’s owner.

Coastal Hospitality is suing the Abbotsford Minor Hockey Association (AMHA), coach James Young and 60 unidentified players and parents for the alleged Feb. 6, 2016 incident. The company filed a notice of civil claim in B.C. Supreme court on Jan. 9, nearly two years after the hockey team stayed at its hotel during a local tournament.

The court documents don’t specify the ages of the players but there was an Atom (ages 10 and younger) A3 Family Day tournament scheduled in Squamish at the same time of the Abbotsford team’s visit.

Coastal says the players were unsupervised when one or more of them damaged the ice machine and, in turn, ruptured the the water line which leaked water into the hallway and down elevator shafts. The water damaged the structure and contents of the hotel, its elevators and cost the hotel lost business, Coastal claims.

All told, the hospitality company says the rupture cost it more than $200,000.

Coastal says the players, coach and parents all failed in the “duty of care” they owed the hotel. It says the parents and coach James Young should have been supervising the players or had supervision arranged and they failed to report the ruptured line “promptly.”

Coastal is seeking general damages, special damages, costs and “such other relief this honourable court deems appropriate.”

Coastal has had ongoing discussions with AMHA’s liability insurers over the last two years, according to Greg Tucker, one of the company’s lawyers. He said the matter was not going to be solved within the two-year limit for litigation and the lawsuit was therefore necessary.

“No one wants to sue unless they have to. Resolution is always preferable,” Tucker wrote in an email.

He said that whether the hotel’s insurance covered the damages, and to what extent, is irrelevant to the claim.

“There is a legal principle known as subrogation under which, where a claim is covered by property insurance, the insurer, subject to certain exceptions, steps into the shoes of the insured with respect to any rights of recovery that the insured has,” Tucker wrote.

The claims have not been proven in court. Representatives from AMHA have not responded to phone calls and emails.


@KelvinGawley
kelvin.gawley@abbynews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Two dead in accident north of Campbell River

Highway closed in both directions

2019 FEDERAL ELECTION: Meet the candidates for the North Island-Powell River riding

In an effort to inform the North Island-Powell River riding constituents, we… Continue reading

PHOTOS: Spirit of Terry Fox lives on in Campbell River

Community turns out for annual run in Fox’s honour

New initiative challenges Campbell Riverites: ‘Don’t walk in the hallways’

Physical literacy is the foundation upon which healthy living is built … and it’s important to practice

Campbell River’s POTA is looking forward to an artsy autumn

Group’s major fundraiser and extravaganza hits Tidemark Theatre Oct. 5

VIDEO: Vancouver Island mayor details emergency response after fatal bus crash

Sharie Minions says she is ‘appalled’ by condition of road where bus crashed

Federal party leaders address gun violence after weekend shooting near Toronto

One teen was killed and five people injured in the shooting

Scheer makes quick campaign stop in Comox

Conservative leader highlights tax promises early in campaign

Conservatives promise tax cut that they say will address Liberal increases

Scheer says the cut would apply to the lowest income bracket

B.C. VIEWS: Cutting wood waste produces some bleeding

Value-added industry slowly grows as big sawmills close

Fewer trees, higher costs blamed for devastating downturn in B.C. forestry

Some say the high cost of logs is the major cause of the industry’s decline in B.C.

Federal food safety watchdog says batch of baby formula recalled

The agency says it’s conducting a food safety investigation

UVic president offers condolences after two students killed in bus crash

‘We also grieve with those closest to these members of our campus community,’ Cassels says

Most Read