Grant pursues mayor’s chair

Wants city to change direction

Coun. Roy Grant is seeking the mayor’s chair in this year’s election and has former and current councillors’ support behind him.

Grant announced his bid for mayor of Campbell River at Spirit Square on Friday in front of a group of nearly 20 supporters that included former councillors Morgan Ostler, Laird Ruehlen and freeman Bill Matthews, as well as current councillor Andy Adams.

After nine years as a councillor, Grant believes he can best effect change at City Hall if he is elected as the city’s new mayor on Nov. 19.

“I just wasn’t up to the task of running for council again,” said Grant. “I think the city is not going in the direction it should be and I’m not the type of person to sit around and complain about things, I do something about it.

“I felt if ever there was a time to run for mayor, this would be the time.”

Grant said he feels the city could benefit from change, but harbours no ill feelings toward current Mayor Charlie Cornfield, who has yet to announce whether he will run again.

“I can only say what I think I’m able to do and what Charlie hasn’t been able to do but one thing I have to say about Charlie is that he always had the city of Campbell River’s best interests close to his heart, there’s no doubt about that,” said Grant. “I give him full credit for the work he’s done as a councillor and as mayor but as far as I’m concerned it’s time for a change in leadership.”

Grant, the longest current serving councillor, also spent six years on city council in Alberta in the 1980s.

While on Campbell River council he gained respect and appreciation from many of his fellow councillors.

Matthews, who worked on council for 23 years, three of them with Grant, believes he is right for the job.

“Roy has always been dedicated to this city and is a positive-thinking guy,” said Matthews, who is also working as Grant’s campaign manager. “He always has the city in the front of his mind, not himself, but the city.”

Matthews said his friend, who he has known for 25 years, is a reasonable person that can get consensus, something he thinks is lacking on the current council.

“He has a common sense approach and is very level-headed. I think he can do a good job,” he said.

Adams, too, thinks Grant is right for the job.

“In the last five and a half years of working with Roy, there has not been a harder working member of council,” said Adams. “The two things about Roy is that he’s positive and optimistic.

“You don’t hear Roy being negative and saying what can’t be done, he’s always looking at what can be done.

“Should I choose to run for council again, I would love to work with Roy as mayor. We have some challenging times ahead and we need some positivity rather than the negative.”

Adams said he also admires how Grant has the ability to respect people with opposing views and bring them together to move forward.

He also noted the sacrifices Grant has made and the time he has spent away from his job as a realtor in order to serve the city.

Grant said he was overwhelmed by the amount of support from Adams, Matthews, Ruehlen and Ostler and believes he won’t disappoint.

“We have faced many challenges in our city in the past years but with proper policy-making and management, we can all work together to reduce those challenges and get on with the business of leading the city into the future,” said Grant. “I am approachable, personable, optimistic, results-oriented and ready to be your mayor. I have shown the leadership and team building qualities required of a city leader and I am ready to use those skills as your mayor.”

Grant also encouraged others to run for council or mayor, noting there will now be an extra spot on council available with him not running.

“Instead of sitting back and complaining about things, put your name forward as a candidate,” he said.

 

 

Just Posted

Mainroad North Island ready to prepare region’s highways for winter

New equipment, processes designed to meet all governments specifications

Plant a tree; save the estuary – TD Tree Day looking for volunteers

Greenways Land Trust supports TD in its target of planting 1 million trees by 2030

New warning siren sound on the Campbell River tested

This week BC Hydro’s new public warning system for the John Hart… Continue reading

Three strong earthquakes reported off Vancouver Island

The quakes, all measuring more than 6.0 on the richter scale, were about 260 kilometres west of Tofino

Eddy reflects on her first Campbell River school trustee campaign

‘I knew that SOGI would be an issue, but I didn’t realize that it would be the only issue’

B.C. sailor surprised by humpback whale playing under her boat

Jodi Klahm-Kozicki said the experience was ‘magical’ near Denman Island

B.C.’s natural gas supply could see 50% dip through winter due to pipeline blast

It’s been two weeks since the Enbridge pipeline ruptured near Prince George on Oct. 9, sparking a large fireball

Mega Millions, Powerball prizes come down to math, long odds

Biggest myth: The advertised $1.6 billion Mega Millions prize and $620 million Powerball prize aren’t quite real

2 Canadians advance to finals at world wrestling championships

Olympic champion Erica Wiebe just missed joining them with a loss 3-1 to three-time world champion Adeline Gray of the United States in the 76-kg event

VIDEO: Fire destroys historic small-town B.C. restaurant

Two people were injured as fire ripped through the Hedley restaurant around 2:30 a.m. Tuesday

B.C. town’s mayoral race a tie, come down to luck of the draw

Harry Gough led incumbent Cindy Fortin by one vote on election night Saturday

Outdoor retailer MEC vows to boost diversity after online complaint

Mountain Equipment Co-op was criticized for perpetuating a white-only picture of the outdoors

Trump vilifies caravan, says he’ll cut Central American aid

Despite Mexican efforts to stop them at the Guatemala-Mexico border, about 5,000 Central American migrants resumed their advance toward the U.S. border Sunday in southern Mexico.

Federal carbon tax rebates will exceed the cost for most people affected

Officials say 70 per cent of people in those provinces will get back more than they end up paying out as fuel costs rise to incorporate the carbon tax.

Most Read