Border crossings in B.C. are expected to be extra busy for Black Friday. (Black Press Media files)

Going to the U.S. for Black Friday? Here’s what you need to know

Bring your passport, not your pot and be ready for long lineups

Planning on heading south of the border for Black Friday shopping? Here’s what you need to know to not get stuck in a lineup, or have your on-sale goodies snatched up by customs officers.

Leave early

If there’s ever a day to leave earlier than you think you need to, U.S. Thanksgiving and Black Friday is the time.

It’s the busiest travel weekend of the year, and the Canada Border Security Agency is warning travellers to check border wait times and seek out a less busy crossing.

The Douglas crossing in Surrey is the busiest land border crossing in B.C. and the CBSA recommends Pacific Highway, Aldergrove or Abbotsford-Huntingdon instead.

VIDEO: Tips to avoid overspending this holiday season

If you’re flying, the Vancouver International Airport says it’s expecting heavy traffic to and around the airport.

It’s asking travellers to take the Canada Line if they can, adding that drivers parking at the long-term value lot near Templeton Station might see extra busy trains as shoppers storm the nearby McArthurGlen Designer Outlet stores.

Be prepared

To keep the lines moving smoothly at the border, make sure you have all your documents – passport, NEXUS – ready to go so you’re not fumbling with them as the agent looks on.

If you’re planning to bring back hundreds of dollars in goods, keep in mind that you have to declare them at the border and possibly pay duties on them. If you want an estimate of how much you’ll pay, check out the CBSA’s calculator here.

One of the key jobs of border guards is to watch for missing kids, so be ready to answer detailed, and even invasive-seeming, questions about any children in your car.

Absolutely no marijuana

Cannabis may be legal in B.C. and Washington State, but it’s a complete no-go at the border.

Pot is still against federal law in the U.S. and is still illegal to take out of Canada. Anyone travelling across the border with cannabis could face criminal charges, even if it’s medicinal and comes with a doctor’s note.

READ MORE: Heading abroad in the legal cannabis era could harsh your buzz


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Bill Reekie and his then-four-year-old granddaughter Lily. Photo contributed
Alzheimer’s – the Unplanned Journey

By Jocelyn Reekie Special to the Mirror “January is Alzheimer’s Awareness Month… Continue reading

The Kwiakah First Nation is looking to lease some Crown land at the old Campbell River Gun Range to create a community garden for its members and a series of greenhouses to sell produce to cover operational costs. Black Press File Photo
Kwiakah First Nation looks to open farm at old Campbell River gun range

City defers decision on allowing it until they can consult with other local First Nations

Lilly and Poppy, two cats owned by Kalmar Cat Hotel ownder Donna Goodenough, both have cerebellAr hypoplasia, a genetic neurological condition that affects their ability to control their muscles and bones. Photo by Alistair Taylor – Campbell River Mirror
VIDEO: Wobbly Cats a riot of flailing legs and paws but bundles of love and joy to their owner

Woman urges others to not fear adopting cats with disabilities

Shawn Decaire does a blessing ceremony for the Hama?Elas Community Kitchen in Campbell River. Photo by Marc Kitteringham, Campbell River Mirror
Hama?Elas Community Kitchen progress shared

Strategic planning, progress made on various projects also discussed at CRDCEH meeting

Forestry companies in B.C. agree to abide by the cedar protocols based on traditional laws of the First Nation members of the Nanwakolas Council. (Photo courtesy, Nanwakolas Council)
B.C. forestry companies agree to abide by cedar protocols drafted by Indigenous council

Western Forest Products and Interfor Corporation among companies to adapt declaration drafted by Nanwakolas Council

Justin Kripps of Summerland and his team have competed in Olympic action and World Cup competitions in bobsleigh. (Jason Ransom-Canadian Olympic Comittee).
QUIZ: Are you ready for some winter sports?

It’s cold outside, but there are plenty of recreation opportunities in the winter months

Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

(Phil McLachlan - Capital News)
‘Targeted’ shooting in Coquitlam leaves woman in hospital

The woman suffered non-life threatening injuries in what police believe to be a targeted shooting Saturday morning

CSWM is planning to increase the space for loading bays at the Comox Valley Waste Management Centre. Record file photo
Comox Strathcona Waste Management plans increase landfill bays

Campbell River facility also key part of capital planning in latest budget

JaHyung Lee, “Canada’s oldest senior” at 110 years old, received his first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine on Thursday, Jan. 14, 2021. He lives at Amenida Seniors Community in Newton. (Submitted photo: Amenida Seniors Community)
A unique-looking deer has been visiting a Nanoose Bay property with its mother. (Frieda Van der Ree photo)
A deer with 3 ears? Unique animal routinely visits B.C. property

Experts say interesting look may be result of an injury rather than an odd birth defect

Standardized foundation skills assessment tests in B.C. schools will be going ahead later than usual, from Feb. 16 to March 12 for students in Grades 4 and 7. (Black Press Media file photo)
B.C. teachers say COVID-affected school year perfect time to end standardized tests

Foundational skills testing of Grade 4 and 7 students planned for February ad March

Sooke’s Jim Bottomley is among a handful of futurists based in Canada. “I want to help people understand the future of humanity.” (Aaron Guillen - Sooke News Mirror)
No crystal ball: B.C. man reveals how he makes his living predicting the future

63-year-old has worked analytical magic for politicians, car brands, and cosmetic companies

Terry David Mulligan. (Submitted photo)
Podcast: Interview with longtime actor/broadcaster and B.C. resident Terry David Mulligan

Podcast: Talk includes TDM’s RCMP career, radio, TV, wine, Janis Joplin and much more

Most Read