Area B Director Noba Anderson rejects allegations made in Strathcona Regional District Board’s censure motions. File photo/Campbell River Mirror

Cortes Island director rejects allegations contained in regional district’s censure

Noba Anderson says she is exploring her legal options

Cortes Island regional district director Noba Anderson is exploring legal options in the wake of her censure by the Strathcona Regional District (SRD) board.

The SRD board passed motions of censure against Electorial Area B director Anderson on Oct. 24 after a censure hearing. According to a SRD press release, “censure is a quasi-judicial authority that the Board of Directors is given to protect governance and procedural fairness should a bylaw or code of conduct be contravened or a breach of the Local Government Act occur. The board may apply a range of penalties to an elected official as long as they do not fetter or limit the ability of the elected official to govern their constituents.”

Anderson replied to the censure motion in a letter to her constituents posted in Tideline, an Cortes Island news site, which she forwarded to the Campbell River Mirror in response to a Nov. 6 story on our website and in print.

RELATED: Strathcona Regional District board passes censure motions against Cortes Island director

“It has indeed been a strange ride at the regional district this past year,” Anderson says. “As you know, a couple weeks ago, we saw another chapter in this twisted story when I was censured and sanctioned by the Strathcona Regional District (SRD) Board for ‘revealing confidential and privileged information… contrary to the Community Charter and the Director Code of Conduct Bylaw 2018.’

“The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines ‘censure’ as ‘a judgment involving condemnation’ or ‘the act of blaming or condemning sternly’ or ‘an official reprimand.’ I’d also like you to know that the jurisprudence around ‘censure’ clearly states that ‘censure’ is to be reserved for particularly egregious transgressions. The trick with this allegation is that the regional district board holds all the cards about what information (or what part of the story) it decides to release to you and when.”

Anderson said she is currently exploring her legal options with legal counsel and is crafting a formal response.

“Given that much remains in camera (secrete/private/not-to-be-disclosed information), at this time I am limited in what I can say,” Anderson says. She did say, however, that:

“1. I do not agree with the allegations contained in the censure resolution;

“2. I did not release confidential or privileged information to the public (or you would certainly have heard about it); and

“3. I take great exception to other Board decisions and practices which remain in-camera.”

She adds, “I can also say that I truly hope that all the information about this long and strange affair between me, the SRD and a few of my constituents, is eventually released to the public. I have nothing to hide and want the truth to be revealed.”

The provisions of the censure motion exclude Anderson from being appointed to any select committees established by the board or any public hearing delegations established by the board, except for public hearing delegations established to consider matters affecting Electoral Area B. Anderson is also excluded from being designated, nominated or appointed by the board to any external organization or agency to represent the interests of the regional district. Anderson is also required to issue a written apology to the board acknowledging her transgressions.

Anderson addressed how the censure will affect her ability to carry out her area director responsibilities.

“As to your questions about how the censure will affect my ability to serve as your elected representative,” she says. “In short, it won’t. I still sit at the Strathcona Regional District Board, the Hospital Board, the Solid Waste Board and the Electoral Area Services Committee. I still have every right and responsibility to do my job serving Cortes and the region, and I will continue to advance your interests before the board. What this is, is an attempt at public shaming… and I am not shamed!

“The district has said that they will not appoint me to future committees or public hearings in other rural areas; although I would submit that fettering a future board’s ability to make a decision is unlawful. When all these frivolous allegations began rolling in a year ago, I was removed from (or technically not re-appointed to) the First Nations Relations Committee. Given the actions of the Board at the time, I foresaw that sanctions against me were likely, and so I phased myself off the one committee on which I still remained – the Strathcona Community Health Network – and transitioned my Co-Chair role to another member. So, there is nothing to remove me from, and if they do not want my attendance at public hearings that has always been the prerogative of the Board.”

Just Posted

Bear raids freezer, gorges on Christmas baking

Hungry bruin virtually ignored meat and fish, focused, instead, on the sweets

Design work for seismic upgrade of John Hart Dam continues

BC Hydro’s planned seismic upgrades to the John Hart Dam are targeted… Continue reading

Residents escape fire in Campbell River mobile home

CR Firefighters respond to mobile home fire this morning. No injuries reported.… Continue reading

Where’s the line between furniture and art?

Local timber framer Chris Zumkeller makes foray into the world of fine art with wood creations

Future of Campbell River Sportsplex will go to public consultation

‘We have buckets on the floor to catch the leaks in the roof. That’s unpalatable to me’

VIDEO: Boys help rescue Cariboo bear cub

The cub, weighing just 24lbs, has been taken to wildlife sanctuary in Northwest B.C. for the winter

‘Things haven’t changed enough:’ Ecole Polytechnique anniversary prompts reflection

Fourteen women were fatally shot by a gunman at the Montreal school on Dec. 6, 1989

B.C. pharmaceutical company’s stocks double in value after successful lupus drug trial

More than 40 per cent of patients using voclosporin saw improvements in kidney function

Second warning on romaine lettuce from California region as another E. coli case reported

Two cases of E. coli have been reported in relation to the illness in the U.S.

Residents in B.C. city could face 133% tax hike in ‘worst case’ lawsuit outcome: report

An average home could see a tax increase of $2,164 in one year

B.C. Transit finds 28 used fareboxes online, saves $300,000

‘Someone joked maybe we can buy used fareboxes on eBay,’ CEO says

Many of Canada’s working poor can’t afford lawyers, don’t qualify for legal aid

One lawyer says many people earn too much to qualify for legal aid, but not enough to really live on

Economy lost 71,200 jobs in November, unemployment rate climbs to 5.9%

Jobless rate is at its highest since August 2018, when it hit 6%

BC Hydro reservoirs see record low rain across Vancouver Island

Hydro electric watersheds are at a third of their normal levels

Most Read