Community forest for city a possibility

The city may be one step closer to having its own community forest

The city may be one step closer to having its own community forest.

At last week’s strategic meeting, councillors voted to hire a forestry consultant for no more than $6,000 to determine the viability of a community forest.

Council was presented with a recommendation to apply for a community forest two months ago but was hesitant to get involved.

Nigel Ross, chair of the city’s Future Forestry Task Force, warned council that there were a number of considerations.

“Campbell River is a forest dependent community and a community forest would fit with the town’s theme,” Ross said. “Community forests can be a viable business and can make a positive fiscal contribution to the town. But it should be kept in mind that any business does have the risk of losing money, especially if social objectives override fiscal priorities.”

Community forests are on provincial land and leased by communities for terms of 25 years, with a renewable option every 10 years. Although the lessee decides when, where and what to log and who to sell the logs to, the location of the forest is a joint decision between the community and the province.

The location of the forest, as well as the objectives, are the biggest factors in whether or not the city could turn a profit.

“If it is run like a business it might make money, if it is run for social reasons then it will probably lose money,” Ross said.

He said if the city is offered a community forest, the land base and the timber resource should be critically evaluated as both have a big impact on profitability.

“There is some vacant crown land around Campbell River that is presently not contributing to the provincial AAC (Annual Allowable Cut),” Ross said. “This land should be incorporated into the Community Forest.

“It should be noted that much of this land is within the Campbell River Community Watershed and could be very environmentally sensitive.”

Ross said if the city goes ahead with a community forest it should also consider making the logs available to local businesses at market prices and management of the forest should not be handled by the city.

“All phases of the community forest should be tendered out,” Ross said.

“The manager should be given clear objectives to achieve. If there is a board of directors the manager reports to, then they should be largely volunteer.”

Ross said he believes a community forest would be a good fit for Campbell River but stresses it can be a risky business.

“The chances of profitability can be greatly improved if actions are taken to maximize revenue and minimize costs,” Ross said.

 

Just Posted

Walkway at new boat ramp closed due to storm damage

Newly-constructed walkway fails its first test

Safety board issues letters over rail crash that killed three workers in Woss

The safety board conducted the investigation at the request of the Transportation Ministry

Man suffering heart attack not allowed to board Quadra Island ferry

Quadra Island man recovering after being airlifted to hospital in Victoria

Georgia Strait Alliance promoting green marinas program in Campbell River

Clean Marine BC aims to reduce impacts of recreational boating facilities

Oyster River salmon numbers bouyant, Quinsam/Campbell data not so

By Neil Cameron Special to the Mirror In a tale of two… Continue reading

VIDEO: ‘I won’t stop’ – local surfer hits the stormy seas of Stories Beach in Campbell River

Surfing community is growing in Campbell River, says Scotty Hewett

Warning issued as forecast calls for 20-foot waves in Tofino

Dangerous waves, strong currents and upper-shoreline flooding expected for Tofino-Ucluelet area

Oil tanker ban to be reviewed by committee

Indigenous groups for and against Bill C-48 travel to Ottawa to influence the Senate’s decision

An 800-pound pig named Theodore needs a forever home, B.C. society says

‘Theodore is not destined to be somebody’s bacon’

Teenager Alphonso Davies wins Canadian Men’s Soccer Player for the Year Award

Derek Cornelius and Chilliwack native, Jordyn Huitema were named Canadian Youth International Players of the Year

B.C. teen MMA fighter shows heart

Young Unity MMA competitors bring home Ws

2,000 Canadians died of an overdose in first 6 months of the year

New data from the Public Health Agency of Canada shows the crisis is not subsiding

Another B.C. city votes to ban single-use plastic bags

First six months of proposed ban would focus on education, not enforcement

Most Read