Illustration of the new welcome signage slated to be installed at two entrances to Campbellton after council approved Phase 1 of the Campbellton Neighbourhood Association’s beautification plan. Image from City of Campbell River Staff Report

Illustration of the new welcome signage slated to be installed at two entrances to Campbellton after council approved Phase 1 of the Campbellton Neighbourhood Association’s beautification plan. Image from City of Campbell River Staff Report

Campbellton to get new wayfinding, welcome signage

Phase two of the CNA’s beautification plan, already budgeted by the city, is a parkette at 19th Ave.

The Campbellton neighbourhood is about to start in on its latest revitalization and beautification plan that will see numerous projects popping up over the next few years.

At its most recent council meeting, the city approved the first phase of the work: wayfinding signage to help direct visitors to places of interest in the area. The Campbellton Neighbourhood Association (CNA) first pitched their current, phased plan in late 2019. The whole plan, once complete, includes the eventual construction of a new parkette where 19th Avenue meets the Campbell River and was approved to receive up to $107,000 from the city.

The Phase One portion of the project involves creating a cycling and walking route through the area, covering approximately 7.5 km of roads that connect to pre-existing trails such as Baikie Island/Raven Trails and Canyonview Trail, signage to direct people to various points of interest along their way as well as two large welcome signs.

“This has been a long project,” said Coun. Ron Kerr in putting forward the motion to approve the wayfinding portion of the project. “If you’ve read the whole thing you can see the amount of on-bike and on-foot work that’s gone into making this happen. I hope everyone will support it and I think it will be a fantastic addition to bike trails and recreation in the Campbellton area.”

The project did, in fact, get support from the rest of council, after a few small tweaks were made to the plan, including the removal of the Myrt Thompson Trail from the signage at the request of the Wei Wai Kum First Nation, which has expressed concerns with the level of upkeep the trail is receiving, causing concerns about safety.

It was also determined that the main entrance signage should have an acknowledgement that the trail system is on the traditional lands of the Laich-kwil-tach First Nations.

The wayfinding portion of the CNA’s plan will cost the city almost $53,000 of its previously-approved $107,000 for the plan in its entirety, leaving just over $54,000 for the creation of the 19th Avenue parkette.

An additional $5,500 will also need to be added to the Parks Department Budget during financial planning deliberations for the upkeep.

Campbell River