On average, 77 people die every year in B.C. in crashes involving distracted driving, according to ICBC. The Campbell River RCMP are stepping up enforcement to reduce preventable death and injury on the road. Black Press Media file photo

Campbell River RCMP launch campaign against high-risk driving

High-risk driving results in an average of 117 deaths annually in B.C., according to RCMP

Police in Campbell River say they’re cracking down on high-risk driving, including the use of electronic devices at the wheel.

It’s part of a month-long campaign happening across B.C., with police stepping up enforcement to reduce preventable death and injury on the road.

“Officers will be focusing on driving behaviours that put people’s lives and property at risk,” Const. Maury Tyre, a spokesperson for the Campbell River RCMP, said in a statement. “With the wonderful summer weather, we see more road users and our goal is to keep everyone safe.”

Extra police will be on the roads in Campbell River dealing with dangerous behaviour at the wheel, according to the May 13 statement.

That includes not only impaired driving and speeding, but also texting or emailing and other forms of distracted driving.

READ MORE: Alcohol and speed believed to be factors in collision – Campbell River RCMP

OUR VIEW: Road safety week underlines impaired-driving dangers

On average, 77 people die every year in B.C. in crashes involving distracted driving, according to ICBC. Distracted driving accounts for more than a quarter of all car crash fatalities.

Overall, high-risk driving results in an average of 117 deaths annually in B.C., according to the RCMP’s provincial traffic services.

Other high-risk behaviours also include following too closely, ignoring traffic control devices, improper passing and racing or doing stunts.

Police are also warning drivers to watch out for cyclists and motorcycle riders, whose numbers increase with the warmer weather.

Meanwhile, cyclists are reminded to follow the rules of the road as well.

“Wearing helmets is of paramount importance and cyclists need to ensure that they can be seen in the pre-dawn and post-dusk hours,” police said in the statement.

Police are asking residents to call the local detachment if they notice any unsafe behaviours, or to call 911 if they suspect a driver is impaired by drugs or alcohol.

The RCMP released the statement just before the start of National Road Safety Week, which is led by the Canadian Association of Police Chiefs.

Each day until May 20 – a statutory holiday that often sees a high number of deadly collisions on the roads – is dedicated to a different aspect of road safety, with Saturday designated as National Enforcement Day.

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