The city is launching an information campaign to remind developers that they are responsible for implementing and maintaining erosion and sediment control measures and could be fined for “fouling a watercourse or the storm drainage system.” Photo courtesy City of Campbell River

Campbell River developers urged to help prevent ‘erosion explosion’

Water that’s too dirty to see through is too dirty to discharge

With the onset of winter rains and snow, development sites in Campbell River are at increased risk of erosion, which threatens local waterways.

“Large areas of exposed soil can suffer severe erosion, and heaps of sediment washing off development sites sends muddy discharge into city storm drains, ditches and creeks – smothering fish habitat and increasing stormdrain maintenance costs,” Terri Martin, the city’s environmental specialist, says in a press release. “Simply put: water that’s too dirty to see through is too dirty to discharge.”

High sediment content in water is measured as turbidity, and the rainiest months run the highest risk of turning into turbid times.

“With all the development work happening in Campbell River right now, there’s cause for additional concern,” Martin says.

To raise awareness, the city is launching an information campaign to remind developers that they are responsible for implementing and maintaining erosion and sediment control measures and could be fined for “fouling a watercourse or the storm drainage system” under the City of Campbell River Environmental Protection Bylaw.

“We all benefit from efforts to keep soil in place and water running clear. Waterways are key ecological features, part of the web that supports our entire ecosystem,” Martin says.

People who have questions about erosion and sediment control and the City’s Environmental Protection Bylaw should contact Terri Martin, the City’s environmental specialist at 250-286-5711 or via email to terri.martin@campbellriver.ca.