Jim Harris, president of the Campbell River Community Founation and chair of the Vital Signs committee, presents the 2016 Vital Signs Report. He expects this years will be even more detailed as there will be focus groups and they will be incorporating the new census data. Photo by Jocelyn Doll/Campbell River Mirror

Campbell River Community Foundation starting work on the 2018 Vital Signs Report

The Campbell River Community Foundation is preparing for a bigger and better Vital Signs report this year.

“We will be utilising those same issue areas in the 2016 report in the 2018 report and providing a little bit of an update on what’s changed…what’s stayed the same across those different indicators,” said Maggie Hodge Kwan, project coordinator.

The foundation released the first report in 2016. It looks at key indicators from census data as well as information gathered via a community survey and, new this year, focus groups to paint a picture of Campbell River’s strengths and weaknesses.

“It leverages local knowledge to measure local community vitality and to support collaborative action towards improving quality of life,” Hodge Kwan said.

The report is packaged in a grab-and-go booklet and covers everything from housing and the income gap, to education and health.

According to Jim Harris, president of the Community Foundation and chair of the project committee, the 2016 report was used by various community organizations including the Chamber of Commerce, the Tourist Information Centre as well as the city.

“With Vital Signs we are aiming to give our community members, our stakeholders, our non-profit organizations and agencies, our elected officials, we’re aiming to give them all that nice packet of essential information so that they can really just have a deeper understanding of the community and so that their actions can be guided by that data,” Hodge Kwan said.

This year, with the addition of the 2016 long form census results, Hodge Kwan and Harris are hopeful they will be able to put together an even more in-depth and informative overview of what is going on in Campbell River.

With these insights as a guide, there is potential for change based on facts to be made.

“We want to leverage the excitement and enthusiasm and interest that people have about their communities and we want to help inform conversations and actions by presenting some of that data that can clarify and help people formulate opinions,” Hodge Kwan said.

The focus groups will be taking place over two weeks this month, but are not open to the public. Through April and March the community foundation will be recruiting people to take the survey.

The document will be released in October.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Conservation: Two elk unlawfully shot in Northern Vancouver Island

‘The elk also did not have all of the edible portions of meat removed’

Nanaimo, Royal Jubilee to be Vancouver Island’s COVID-19 frontline hospitals

Other Island hospitals will be admitting COVID-19 patients and will be used in a support role

Kilted window-washers helping seniors with groceries

Campbell River Men In Kilts employees volunteer to go shopping for seniors and others

March domestic violence figures show no impact from social isolation, Campbell River RCMP say

Campbell River RCMP see no evidence social isolation is causing an increase… Continue reading

COVID-19: Trudeau says 30K ventilators on the way; 3.6M Canadians claim benefits

Canada has seen more than 17,000 cases and at least 345 deaths due to COVID-19

Campbell River community COVID-19 agencies, services and resources list

The list outlines status of social agencies in the community

Logan Boulet Effect: Green Shirt Day calls on Canadians to become organ donors

While social distancing, the day also honours the 16 lives lost in the 2018 Humboldt Broncos Crash

COMMENTARY: Knowing where COVID-19 cases are does not protect you

Dr. Bonnie Henry explains why B.C. withholds community names

B.C. wide burning restrictions come into effect April 16

‘Larger open burns pose an unnecessary risk and could detract from wildfire detection’

B.C. secures motel, hotel rooms for COVID-19 shelter space

Community centres, rooms reserved for pandemic self-isolation

Look at hospitalizations, not recovery stats for COVID-19, B.C. professor says

Cases in hospital are a definitive count of people who have the novel coronavirus

B.C. First Nations want to launch fight of Trans Mountain pipeline approval

Last month, the Supreme Court of Canada decided not to hear five challenges about the pipeline

Most Read