10 B.C. cities break temperature records in winter storm

Quesnel dipped to -41.9 C, breaking a record from 1916

It’s no surprise that the ongoing blast of winter broke a handful of weather records this week – the oldest dating back to 1916.

On Wednesday, Quesnel dipped to -41.9 C, according to Environment Canada, surpassing the 104-year-old record of -41.1 C. Weather records in the area have been recorded by the weather agency since 1893.

A number of weather advisories have been in effect across the province since Sunday as a Pacific cold system makes its way through B.C., bringing with it frigid cold temperatures and heavy snowfall.

Meteorologist Baljit Sekhon told Black Press Media that people can expect temperatures to start nearing back to regular temperatures in the coming days.

ALSO READ: Blast of winter continues across B.C., bringing frigid weather and more snow

“In terms of that we’re starting to warm up now and the coldest air is kind of behind us,” he said. “We have a rebound coming to warmer temperatures this weekend and a near-normal trend should carry on to end of the month.”

The unpredictability of snowfall makes it hard for forecasters to determine when records are actually broken, Sekhon explained, because it doesn’t snow each day during a snow storm.

However, Sekhon was able to confirm that Comox Valley and Courtenay both beat prior records Wednesday with a snowfall accumulation of 34.8 centimetres – more than 10 centimetres more than on the same day in 1951 when it snowed 23.4 centimetres.

The Greater Victoria area also broke a record, from 1971, of 20 centimetres of snow compared to 9.9 centimetres.

B.C. cities which broke temperature records include:

Burns Lake Area: -44.1 C (-41.1 C in 1950)

Clinton: -33.3 C (-29.8 C in 2005)

Kitimat: -24 C (-20.6 C in 1971)

Malahat: -7.2 C (-6 C in 1987)

Prince George: -44.4 C (-41.2 C in 1979)

Puntzi Mountain: -48.8 C (-37.4 C in 2005)

Quesnel: -41.9 C (-41.1 C in 1916)

Squamish: -12.5 C (-8 C in 2005)

Tatlayoko Lake: -35.4 C (-35 C in 1950)

Vanderhoof: -44 C (-40 C in 1937)


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

As SD84 schools look to reopen, Kyuquot and Zeballos opt out

Schools in Tahsis and Gold River will open on June 1, with 30 per cent students expected to come in

RCMP calls decrease in Campbell River

Total for year up compared to 2019

Campbell River RCMP ask drivers to slow down in construction zones

Highlight lower speed through the Hwy. 19A project

Recycling depots in Campbell River, Courtenay to close

The unstaffed recyling depot at Strathcona Gardens Recreation Complex is set to close July 1

B.C. legislature coming back June 22 as COVID-19 emergency hits record

Pandemic restrictions now longer than 2017 wildfire emergency

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the world in ways that would have… Continue reading

Mirror business directory and map

If you’d like to be added to the list, shoot us an email

B.C.’s essential grocery, hardware store employees should get pandemic pay: retail group

Only B.C.’s social, health and corrections workers are eligible for top-ups

COLUMN: Canada needs to remember rural communities as thoughts turn to pandemic recovery

Small towns often rely on tourism, which has been decimated by COVID-19

Edmonton, Vancouver and Toronto vying to be NHL hubs, but there’s a catch

The NHL unveiled a return-to-play plan that would feature 24 teams

B.C. sees 9 new COVID-19 cases, one death as officials watch for new cases amid Phase Two

Number of confirmed active cases is at 244, with 37 people in hospital

Illicit-drug deaths up in B.C. and remain highest in Canada: chief coroner

More than 4,700 people have died of overdoses since B.C. declared a public health emergency in early 2016

CMHC sees declines in home prices, sales, starts that will linger to end of 2022

CMHC said average housing prices could fall anywhere from nine to 18 per cent in its forecast

Most Read