From $5,000 in seed money back in the early 1990s, the Campbell River Community Foundation’s endowment has grown to more than $2 million! Earlier this year, the volunteer board distributed a record $60,000 to 27 different organizations, in addition to $7,300 distributed through specific funds! Ingrid Thomas photo

Campbell River Community Foundation creates a lasting local legacy

Shining a light on city’s needs and opportunities to help

When the Campbell River Community Foundation hosts its sold-out cabaret fundraiser this month, it will not only be celebrating this year’s record-setting local grants, but eyeing all that it can achieve in the coming year … with your help.

“We are a group of volunteer citizens who really want to focus donor funds on areas of the most need in the community, and create a lasting legacy for the next generation and beyond,” explains board member Sandra Hengel.

Through Community Foundations, donated funds are set aside in perpetuity, and as that principal grows, the interest is used to provide grants to charities working to make the community a better place.

Inspired by the longstanding work of foundations across Canada and the community spirit embodied throughout Campbell River, the Foundation has been shining a light on the needs and opportunities in the region since the early 1990s. In fact, from $5,000 in seed money, the Foundation’s endowment has grown to more than $2 million, and earlier this year, the volunteer board distributed a record $60,000 to 27 different organizations, and that’s in addition to $7,300 distributed through specific funds!

Vital Signs for a vital community

Guiding the Campbell River Community Foundation is Vital Signs, a community snapshot taken every two years to assess what’s working well in Campbell River and what needs a little help – everything from housing and education to community involvement and wellness.

Through community input and local statistics, the Vital Signs report forms an invaluable tool for the Foundation’s granting committee, as well as local governments, donors and others looking for guidance about local needs.

This year, the Foundation will use the report’s results to look more closely at homelessness and family poverty. “Through Vital Signs, we’re shining a little light into those corners of the community,” Hengel says.

You can help create a lasting legacy

In addition to the opportunity to create a lasting legacy in Campbell River, community foundations provide donors with flexible options for contributing to their community in whatever way makes the most sense for them.

You can donate to the general endowment fund, for example, or create your own fund within the Foundation. You can also earmark your donation to a particular area, such as children and youth or the environment.

Beyond individual donors, families, organizations, private foundations and business are all encouraged to get involved in helping their community with everything from cash donations, stocks and bonds, to bequests, life insurance, memorial gifts and more.

In fact, you can even donate right now through their secure online portal!

Ready to learn more? Visit the Campbell River Community Foundation today at crfoundation.ca or call 250-923-5575.

 

Guiding the Campbell River Community Foundation is Vital Signs, a community snapshot taken every two years to assess what’s working well in the region and what needs a little help – everything from housing and education to community involvement and wellness.

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