Greenways Land Trust manager Cynthia Bendickson deadheads a yellow flag iris in the Campbell River estuary. Greenways will be leading two iris removal sessions in the estuary next week.

Yellow flag iris in the Campbell River estuary is pretty – pretty awful

The invasive iris replaces diverse native vegetation in wetland ecosystems

Yellow flag iris probably arrived in Campbell River because it looks pretty in ponds, but it also has a nasty side and could get out of hand in the sensitive Campbell River estuary if left to its own devices.

The invasive iris replaces diverse native vegetation in wetland ecosystems with dense homogenous stands of iris. This is bad news for native plants, as well as the animals and fish and humans that rely on them. Each year Greenways Land Trust and the Nature Conservancy of Canada work to stop the spread of yellow flag iris at some of Campbell River’s most important ecological sites. Their annual effort is happening next week and they need volunteers to help.

On Wednesday, July 29, volunteers will deadhead iris flowers on Baikie Island from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Meet at the Baikie Island Kiosk at 9 a.m.

On Friday, July 31, volunteers will dig iris roots next to the Myrt Thompson trail from 9-11 a.m. Meet at the silver bridge on the Myrt Thompson trail at 9 a.m. Volunteers should wear gumboots and dress for the weather. For more information, contact 250-287-3785 or volunteer@greenwaystrust.ca.