Mayor Andy Adams thanks those assembled downtown Tuesday for their work and support in getting the new mural installed downtown, adding that he hopes it is just the second of many vibrant additions to the community in the coming years. Photo by Mike Davies/Campbell River Mirror

New mural the latest in Campbell River’s ongoing beautification

Mayor hopes public will suggest ideas for many more future projects

The City of Campbell River hopes the recent completion of a mural at the intersection of Shoppers Row, 16th Avenue and 11th Avenue is just the latest of what will be many works of art to grace our streets in the coming years.

Mayor Andy Adams, along with a few other members of city council, the Downtown Business Improvement Association (BIA) and the Campbell River Arts Council, “unveiled” the latest Alex Witcombe mural on Tuesday.

“We’re calling it the unveiling, but it’s unveiled. It’s there and it’s awesome,” Adams said, crediting the arts council and the BIA with making it a reality.

Adams pointed out that this was Witcombe’s second large-scale piece in the downtown core – the other being on Pier Street on the building that houses the Centre for Aquatic Health Sciences.

“While that’s a stunning entrance coming into the downtown of Campbell River, this intersection is really the focal point of our cultural precinct, and there’s no better place to have a very vibrant, creative and inspiring piece of art,” Adams said.

And he’s hoping these two pieces are just the start of making the community much more colourful and artistic.

Right now – and through the rest of November – “there is a call open for anyone who has ideas for art pieces or creativity to add vibrancy to the community,” Adams said after the official event.

There aren’t any official locations awaiting works to be installed, rather Adams is encouraging the public to just keep their eyes open to opportunities they see around them in the community.

“If you’re walking around and you see something, snap a picture and envision something that could be there, whether it’s a sculpture or a piece art of some kind – it doesn’t necessarily need to be a mural.”

He also says, however, that he’d like to suggestions that don’t require a lot of financial upkeep, because that’s harder to work into the budget.

“While the crosswalks are wonderful, what we’re seeing in Victoria and Nanaimo and Vancouver is that painted crosswalks don’t last,” he says. “With all the tire traffic, you’re looking at $1,000 per year per crosswalk (in maintenance cost), so while I know there have been suggestions to do more of them, I think the direction I would give people is to look for other canvases. Look at walls and poles and even sidewalks and things like that. Places that will have as much impact but be longer lasting.”

Proposals for new art projects can be made through the city’s public art website at campbellriverpublicart.ca until 4 p.m. Nov. 30.