Harry Manx fuses of Eastern and Western traditions.

Manx fuses Eastern and Western music at the Heriot Bay Inn 

Harry Manx has spent years fusing eastern musical traditions with the blues.

He switches effortlessly between guitar, harmonica, banjo and the mohan veena, a 20-stringed instrument invented by Manx’s mentor Vishwa Mohan Bhatt. Manx is returning to the Heriot Bay Inn Dec. 4-5.

Manx blends Indian folk melodies with slide guitar blues, adds a sprinkle of gospel and some compelling grooves to create his unique “mysticssippi” flavour.

He quickly envelops the audience with his warm vocals and the beautiful melodies of his original songs. It’s hard to resist, easy to digest and keeps audiences coming back for more.

Manx has an impressive collection of awards to prove how skilled and hard-working he is. He’s received seven Maple Blues Awards and his mantel shelf also holds honours from the Canadian Folk Music Awards, Vancouver magazine Georgia Straight, and the South Australia Blues Society.

He received CBC Radio’s Great Canadian Blues Awards for 2007 and his albums have garnered five Juno nominations.

Experience Harry Manx live Dec. 4-5 at the Heriot Bay Inn. Seats are $79 and include a two course dinner; there are a  limited number of show-only seats available at $59. Call the Heriot Bay Inn to reserve your seats: 250-285-3322.

It’s in the live setting, Manx says, that the bridge between “heavenly” India and “earthy” American blues is most effectively built.

“Indian music moves inward,” he says. “It’s traditionally used in religious ceremonies and meditation, because it puts you into this whole other place. But Western music has the ability to move out, into celebration and dance.

“So when we play the Indian stuff on stage, it has the tendency to draw people into something really deep. Then we’ll play some more Western music, and it grounds them, they sort of come out of the mood the Indian music had put them in and get into the performance. My goal has always been to draw the audience as deep as possible into the music.”

 

Just Posted

Campbell River city council won’t support cannabis license, citing First Nation opposition and ‘at-risk youth’ nearby

The third application to come before council is the first to be denied city support

Former Campbell Riverite reaches Everest summit

Clayton Matthews’ team got to the top of the world earlier this week

Campbell River RCMP arrest violent offender

Police struggle with suspect and take him down with a taser

Strathcona Regional District fiscal health gradually improving, staff say

Tax and service revenue was up for the SRD in 2018, while grant money was down

Rescuers finally persuade Eiffel Tower climber to come down

The official said the man was ‘under control and out of danger’ on Monday night

Oil companies, 24-cent gap between B.C., Alberta to be focus of gas price probe

Premier John Horgan called the spike in gas prices ‘alarming’

Motorcycle deaths spike 50% since 2017

Riders were most likely fatally crash on the weekends compared with the rest of the week

Mother of accused charged in death of Surrey teen girl found in torched SUV

Manjit Kaur Deo charged with ‘accessory after the fact’ in 2017 death of Surrey teen

Family of B.C. pilot killed in Honduras trying to ‘piece together’ tragedy

Patrick Forseth has a number of friends in the area and was loved by everyone

Justin Trudeau credits immigration for Canada’s growing tech sector

Trudeau stressed that Canada has become a major source of talent for tech all over the world

Feds launch tourism strategy designed to boost sector 25 per cent by 2025

The fund is supposed to back experiences that show off Canada’s strengths

Mamma Mia! poised to be biggest Chemainus Theatre show ever

Plenty of buzz as Island dinner theatre schedules ABBA-fueled romp

New book from Island author details social history of the E&N railway

Along the E&N tells the story of 32 establishments from Esquimalt to Campbell River.

Most Read