Colin James will headline the 2018 Laketown Rock festival held in Vancouver Island’s Cowichan Valley.

Laketown Rock fest returns with Colin James, Big Wreck, Collective Soul

Second annual event in Cowichan Valley set for the second weekend of summer

A cross-generational collection of bands will hit the stage during this summer’s Laketown Rock festival, held in Vancouver Island’s Cowichan Valley from June 29 to July 1.

The second annual fest will feature Colin James, Collective Soul, Creedence Clearwater Revisited, Kim Mitchell and Big Wreck, event producers announced Wednesday (April 11).

The three-day festival, billed as “family-friendly,” includes camping options. Tickets go on sale Friday, April 13 at 10 a.m. via laketownrock.com.

Festival founder Greg Adams has partnered with Live Nation Canada to stage this year’s event, which will also include performances by Barney Bentall, The Grapes of Wrath, Sass Jordan, Odds and others.

The venue at Laketown Ranch features the largest permanent outdoor stage in Canada, on a 172-acre site only minutes from Cowichan Lake, according to Live Nation Canada.

The 2018 event will also feature a festival village with food and other vendors, full-service bars, VIP area, flush toilets and showers.

“Laketown Ranch is one of the most impressive festival sites we have come across,” stated Ryan Balaski, festival producer with Live Nation Canada.

“The Laketown Rock team has built a world-class facility here and we are excited to work with them in bringing a unique rock experience to the Island. The festival’s diverse lineup and picturesque location ensures there will be something for everyone.”

Here’s the full Laketown Rock artist lineup for 2018:

Colin James

Collective Soul

Creedence Clearwater Revisited

Kim Mitchell

Big Wreck

Barney Bentall

The Grapes of Wrath

Sass Jordan

Odds

Youngblood

The Static Shift

Deep Sea Gypsies

Man Made Lake

Stinging Belle

Malahat

Maverick Cinema

Quadra Sound

Sweeet Action

Stray Cougar

Tan and Hide

Weak Patrol

Lance Lapointe Band

Lost Octave

Hypeman and the Worms

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