Amongst the films to screen in Campbell River and taking the opposing tack to scaling mountain heights is The Ario Dream, which tells the story of one of the most dangerous and spellbinding pursuits: cave diving. From the Ario Dream by Paul Diffley

Film festival celebrates adventure, perseverance and human endeavour

From high adrenaline to quiet appreciation for art and the environment the Banff Mountain Film Festival brings a stunning array of emotions and locations to Campbell River and Quadra Island later this month.

Join local host Philip Stone at the Tidemark Theatre on Tuesday, Nov. 27 and Thursday, Nov. 29, and on Quadra Island at the Community Centre on Saturday, Dec. 1 for this highly anticipated annual event.

“Every year the films seem to get better and better,” Stone says “The explosion in technology from high resolution cameras in phones to drones is putting cutting edge film-making tools into many hands. The results are incredible and we get to see the best of it right here in Campbell River.”

Every year adventurers, film-makers, authors and athletes from all over the world gather in Banff, Alberta at the beginning of November for the Banff Festival. After a week of workshops, presentations and premiers a juried selection of the best films head out onto the road to over 500 community venues in more than 40 countries.

Amongst the films to screen in Campbell River and taking the opposing tack to scaling mountain heights is The Ario Dream, which tells the story of one of the most dangerous and spellbinding pursuits: cave diving. This is a rare insight into a world rarely seen as it tells the tale of the culmination of a fifty year quest to explore the deepest cave system in Europe in the Picos de Europa mountains, Northern Spain.

The Ario Dream is a gripping account of ‘expedition-style’ cave exploration involving underground camps and complex logistics, and where the penalties for unforeseen emergencies or problems are severe. At the apex of the operation are the cave divers, pushing into the unknown in deep sumps where rescue is not an option. The tension, as each diver disappears into the blackness, is genuine.

With the main festival in Banff having just wound down organizers are busy building the road show program. The full line up of films for each of the three local shows will be announced soon and can be found online at www.wildisle.ca

The Banff Mountain Film Festival has long been a key event tying members of the outdoor community together. This year Campbell River Search and Rescue will receive a donation from the proceeds of this year’s festival.

Don’t miss this fabulous opportunity to take in some of the world’s best films: Tuesday and Thursday, Nov. 27 and 29 at the Tidemark Theatre and Dec. 1 at the Quadra Community Centre. Shows start at 7 p.m. Tickets available in advance at tidemarktheatre.com or take your chance at the door.