Local artist Pavel Barta begins the process of cutting and folding one of the mini cottages he designed for the Campbell River Arts Council’s latest fundraising initiative.

Arts Council miniaturizes in order to grow

Sale of mini cottages to help keep valuable community programming

The Campbell River Arts Council is hoping to add a little family fun to their latest round of fundraising.

The organization has commissioned local artist Pavel Barta to produce a model that people can cut out and fold up as a family project while supporting the council’s community-based initiatives.

Modelled on Barta’s recent creation of the Haig-Brown house for their annual festival, the Arts Council’s paper “cut and fold” project is of Sybil Andrews Cottage in Willow Point, for good reason.

“The Arts Council manages the Sybil Andrews Cottage on behalf of the city, and this is still the only property and building in the city that’s on the Heritage Registry,” says Arts Council executive director Ken Blackburn. “So, for the city, this is an important part of its heritage, and we take that very seriously. The more awareness we can bring to the cottage and Sybil’s story, the more the community will hopefully understand its value.”

But while managing that property and promoting the legacy of a renowned local artist are two of their major responsibilities, “we also need to raise funds for our various community-based programming,” Blackburn says. “We have the Art in the Hospital program, we have Music for Seniors, we have a head injury program, we work in partnership with youth outreach programming in town – which is of great benefit to youth that are in Family Services programming or youth that is at risk, for example. We also run projects like the community banner project and manage the Public Art Program in town.”

And in order to keep offering all of those community-based programs, Blackburn says, “we were thinking, ‘how could we have a fundraiser that would also help raise the profile of the cottage and of Sybil, and do it in a fun way, and a seasonal way?’”

So, for a minimum $10 donation to the Arts Council, community members can purchase a package of sheets to make their cut and fold model of the cottage – including instructions – or for $20 they can buy one that has been pre-assembled by volunteers.

But why does the Arts Council need to do fundraisers, anyway? Considering they manage the city’s only heritage site and receive grants from multiple funding bodies, shouldn’t they be all set financially?

“Well, all of the funding sources we have as a not-for-profit have expectations that you also raise money yourself,” Blackburn says. “No funder out there gives you 100 per cent of your needs. Anybody in the not-for-profit world knows that.

“Our combination of city funding, gaming funding, BC Arts Council funding, those are all contingent on the fact that they are partners with us, but as a partner, we are also responsible to bring our percentage to the table.”

They normally do that by selling memberships in the council, renting out the cottage and accepting donations to the cause, but this holiday season Blackburn is hoping these little cottages will be a well-received additional twist on their traditional fundraising efforts.

“It’s something that families can do together,” Blackburn says, “and I think most of us have some memory of doing these types of cut and fold things – whether they were doll houses or whatever – we all remember those types of things from our youth, so there’s a nostalgic aspect to it, as well.

“The idea of people being able to have a mini version of the cottage isn’t ultimately the point,” Blackburn says. “It’s a vehicle by which people can support community-based programming, but it’s done in a way that is fun, family-oriented, heritage based – all the things that we try to provide here at the Arts Council.”

The mini cottages – and the sheets to cut and fold your own – will be available at the Arts Council office (in the actual, full-size cottage in Willow Point) and the Museum at Campbell River, as well as various other locations around town.

For more information or to get involved with the mini cottage fundraiser contact Blackburn at 250-923-0213 or arts.council@crarts.ca

Just Posted

Artists ‘battle’ it out in Campbell River’s downtown

The excitement of Art Battle hit Campbell River’s streets Wednesday night as… Continue reading

Dogwood traffic between Merecroft and Robron a growing concern

Residents and businesses in the area have asked for a new crosswalk at Dogwood and Cortez

City ‘temporarily secures’ railing following near-miss for toddler in Campbell River

Contracted welder will later make a permanent repair, according to Campbell River city staff

First Open Heart Society gifts $25,000 to the Campbell River Hospital Foundation

The Campbell River Hospital Foundation (CRHF) received a $25,000 gift from the… Continue reading

Fashion Fridays: 5 casual summer dress styles

Kim XO, helps to keep you looking good on Fashion Fridays on the Black Press Media Network

Port Hardy RCMP cleared in arrest that left man with broken ribs, punctured lung: IIO

The IIO noted the matter will not be referred to crown counsel for consideration of charges.

Couple found dead along northern B.C. highway in double homicide

Woman from the U.S. and man from Australia found dead near Liard Hot Springs

B.C. man pleads guilty in snake venom death of toddler

Plea comes more than five years after the incident in North Vancouver

Trudeau says Ottawa open to proposals for B.C. refinery as gas prices soar

Prime minister says he knows B.C. residents are struggling and the federal government is open to ideas

Clock’s ticking to share how you feel about Daylight Saving Time in B.C.

Provincial public survey ends at 4 p.m. on Friday

B.C. First Nation’s group using ads in Texas targeting company for fuel spill

The Heiltsuk Tribal Council has called out Kirby Corporation for the Nathan E. Stewart oil spill

B.C. woman wins record $2.1 million on casino slot machine

‘That night was so surreal … I wasn’t able to sleep or eat for the first two days,’ she said

After B.C. dad’s death, Technical Safety BC wants changes to trampoline park rules

Jay Greenwood, 46, did ‘a series of acrobatic manoeuvres prior to a fall that caused serious injury and cardiac arrest’

Most Read