There won’t be any in-person tours of the Haig-Brown House during the Art+Earth Festival this year. But the Museum at Campbell River will be releasing video tours of the property over the festival weekend. File photo by Marissa Tiel – Campbell River Mirror

Art+Earth Festival gets growing this weekend

Find out what events are in-person and what’s happening online

This weekend, arts and the environment will join forces for the second annual Art+Earth Festival. With restrictions on groups gathering due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, the festival will look much different than it did during its inaugural year. However, organizers have come together to put on an event with both in-person and virtual events.

Check out what’s going on below:

Art+Earth Festival Schedule

Sept. 24

Olivia Whetung’s Sugarbush Shrapnel

1 p.m. @ Campbell River Art Gallery

Whetung is a member of the Curve Lake First Nation and a citizen of the Nishnaabeg Nation. According to a description of the exhibit, a thread of her work explores “ways that knowledge is carried by language, land and bodies of water.” In Sugarbush Shrapnel, she “expands these material and conceptual investigations to consider her own connections to the complex ecosystem of her home on Chemong Lake, Ontario, particularly the importance of food sovereignty and the fragility of symbiotic relationships in an era of accelerating climate change and the environmental destruction.”

Sept. 25

‘Salmon Capital’ Film Release

10 a.m. online

The film showcases how salmon have been the common thread woven through the fabric of time and culture in the community. It will be released on the Telus Story Hive YouTube Channel and an interview with the filmmaker, Eiko Jones, will be posted on the Arts Council’s Facebook Page.

Zooming In: Campbell River Estuary & Baikie Island

11 a.m. online

Greenways Land Trust biologists will host a Zoom meeting. Learn about the transformation of the estuary over the last 20 years as it transitioned from an industrial site into a greenscape.

Vitual interview with Libby King

12 p.m. online

Writer Libby King was an artist-in-residence at the Walter Morgan Studio this summer.

Sept. 26

Virtual interview with Orland Hansen

1 p.m. online

Carver Orland Hansen (Simituk) was an artist-in-residence at the Walter Morgan Studio this summer.

Sept. 27

Annual Stewardship Awards

4 p.m. @ Tidemark Theatre and online

The City of Campbell River is celebrating community members making a difference to our environment. The awards will be streamed live from the Tidemark Theatre.

11th Annual Haig Brown Lecture

7 p.m. @ Tidemark Theatre and online

Eiko Jones, award-winning photographer and filmmaker, will be presenting his new film, Heartbeat of the River, and speaking about his observations and experiences up-close with salmon and other animals in local waterways.

Ongoing

Haig-Brown Readings

The Fall Festival at Haig-Brown House has gone digital this year. Readings from the study at the house have been pre-recorded and will be released on the Museum at Campbell River’s YouTube Channel.

Nature Mandala Contest

Photos must be submitted by Sept. 27 to info@greenwaystrust.ca

The Nature Mandala Contest is presented by Greenways Land Trust. Using found natural objects – think leaves, sticks, rocks, pine cones – create a piece of circular art. Participating artists should be 10 and under. The winner will be picked by a young judging panel and will win a gift certificate to Coho Books.

Window Poetry

Head downtown to experience one of the festival’s few in-person events. New work has been created on the theme of art and earth and posted on storefront windows.

Virtual Tours at the Haig-Brown House

It’s a chance to explore inside the house and around the grounds from the comfort of your home. The grounds are also open for in-person exploration. The Museum at Campbell River has put together a scavenger hunt.

Good Grub

5 p.m. – 8 p.m. @ Beach Fire Brewing and Nosh House

Beach Fire will be highlighting a locally-inspired dish over the festival weekend. No reservations required and COVID-19 regulations in place.

For more information about the festival, visit crarts.ca/artandearth


@marissatiel
marissa.tiel@campbellrivermirror.com

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