World-renowned fish researcher set to take Tidemark Stage for annual Haig-Brown Lecture

Dr. Daniel Pauly to discuss dwindling fish stocks and the human impact on them Oct. 16

The annual Haig-Brown lecture is quickly approaching, and this year’s event features a topic – and one of the world’s foremost experts – on a subject near the top of many people’s minds these days, especially on our coast: fish populations.

University of British Columbia professor Dr. Daniel Pauly acquired his doctorate in fisheries biology from the University of Kiel in 1979 and has spent most of his waking moments since studying global fisheries, going so far as to found and lead a large research project devoted to identifying and quantifying fisheries trends world-wide.

He also founded FishBase.org, an online encyclopedia of more than 30,000 species of fish, authored or co-authored more than 1,000 scientific articles, books and book chapters on fish and fish-related topics and is the recipient of multiple international prizes and awards, including being knighted by the French government for his research work.

His presentation, being held Oct. 16 at the Tidemark Theatre and entitled “Reflections on Shrinking Fish and Warming Oceans,” is the 10th annual Haig-Brown Lecture, so it’s a bit special, according to Ken Blackburn, who organizes and oversees the event each year.

“We’ve brought in world class speakers over the years, and Daniel Pauly certainly continues this trend,” Blackburn says. “He’s one of the most respected people on the planet in terms of researching the marine world, and with all of the current focus on fish stocks and the human impact on the health of our oceans, Daniel will offer great insight into the discussion. This is at the heart of the annual Haig-Brown Lecture.”

Pauly says his message is that fisheries and fish populations are in trouble, but he isn’t coming to town to either yell doom and gloom from a soapbox or espouse optimism that things can change if only we take action. It’s not an “optimism” or “pessimism” kind of exploration, Pauly says, just one of science-based facts and data.

“The issue at hand is not one of style or psychology (optimist or pessimist), but one of correct diagnosis and identifying what can and should be done by whom,” Pauly says. “Whether they will be done is something that I can’t know. Churchill, in June 1940, did not answer the question whether he was an optimist or pessimist, but whether Britain should fight or surrender.

“I would like people to walk away (from the evening) with an understanding that fisheries issues are similar to other issues that humanhind faces in that we expect natural resources – water, soils, minerals, biodoversity, air, etc. – to supply the increasing demand from our increasing numbers forever.”

After the talk, guests will be treated to a special screening of the documentary An Ocean Mystery: The Missing Catch, a film that follows Pauly as he investigates tracking of data from fisheries in various locations around the world. The film was co-produced by the Living Oceans Foundation and the Smithsonian Channel and explores how bad and incomplete data masks how close the world is to doing irreparable harm to its fish stocks as Pauly and his team spend 15 years investigating global fishing practices.

It has been nominated and awarded many laurels from various international film festivals, including winning the Green Spark Award at the 2017 American Conservation Film Festival and being named Best Conservation Film at the 2017 International Ocean Film Festival in San Francisco.

Tickets for the night are only $15 (plus applicable taxes and fees) and are available at the Tidemark box office or online at tidemarktheatre.com

For a sample of Pauly’s energy and passion, check out his TED talk, entitled “The Ocean’s Shifting Baseline.”



miked@campbellrivermirror.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A 3.0-magnitude earthquake occurred off Ucluelet just after 12:30 a.m. on April 10 and was reportedly felt as far south as Oregon. (Map via United States Geological Survey)
Quake off Ucluelet reportedly felt as far south as Oregon

Magnitude 1.5 earthquake also reported off Vancouver Island’s west coast hours earlier

The inside of the Campbell River Community Centre gymnasium has been marked off in order to facilitate the public flowing through the clinic as they receive their COVID-19 vaccination. Photo by Alistair Taylor – Campbell river Mirror
Leftover vaccines go into arms, not down the drain: Island Health

No unused COVID-19 vaccines are going to waste at the end of… Continue reading

Where urban and natural landscapes meet can be a very interesting place. The Museum at Campbell River and Greenways Land Trust are hosting a talk on Earth Day on that topic. Photo by Marc Kitteringham, Campbell River Mirror
Where urban and natural meet

Earth Day talk looks at urban biodiversity

Ryan Rasmussen goes on a training run on Quadra Island. Photo supplied.
Quadra Island man to run 160 km to raise funds for alternative cancer care

‘I feel like I need to be in pain to raise the money… I can’t do something that’s easy’ — Ryan Rasmussen

B.C. Health Minister Adrian Dix and Premier John Horgan describe vaccine rollout at the legislature, March 29, 2021. (B.C. government)
1,262 more COVID-19 infections in B.C. Friday, 9,574 active cases

Province’s mass vaccination reaches one million people

Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

As of Saturday, April 10, people born in 1961 are the latest to be eligible for a COVID-19 vaccine. (Black Press files)
B.C. residents age 60+ can now register to get their COVID-19 vaccine

Vaccine registration is now open to people born in 1961 or earlier

A new saline gargle test, made in B.C., will soon be replacing COVID-19 nasal swab tests for kids. (PHSA screenshot)
Take-home COVID-19 tests available for some B.C. students who fall ill at school

BC Children’s Hospital plans to provide 1,200 kits to Vancouver district schools this April

Ruming Jiang and his dog Chiu Chiu are doing fine following a brush with hypothermia that saw several people work together to get them out of the Fraser River near Langley’s Derby Reach Park on March 25, 2021 (Special to the Advance Times)
Man finds men who rescued him from drowning in B.C.’s Fraser River

A grateful Ruming Jiang says he will thank them again, this time in person when the pandemic ends

The 10-part Netflix series Maid, which is being exclusively shot in Greater Victoria, was filming near Prospect Lake in Saanich last month. (Photo courtesy Fred Haynes)
Province announces $150,000 towards South Island film studio, fulfilling B.C. NDP promise

Investment to fund movie studio feasibility study at Camosun College

Tyson Ginter, 7, is proud of his latest Hot Wheels he recently received by Quesnel RCMP Const. Matt Joyce. (Photo submitted)
B.C. Mountie handing out toy cars to light up children’s faces

‘A lot of times it will be the only interaction they have with the police,’ says Const. Matt Joyce

Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam speaks during a technical briefing on the COVID pandemic in Canada, Friday, January 15, 2021 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Canada’s ICUs see near-record of COVID-19 patients last week as variant cases double

Last week, Canadian hospitals treated an average of 2,500 patients with COVID-19, daily, up 7% from the previous week

University of Victoria rowing coach Barney Williams at the University of Victoria in Victoria, B.C. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
UVic, women’s rowing coach deny former athlete’s allegation of verbal abuse

Lily Copeland alleges coach Barney Williams would stand close to her and speak aggressively in the sauna

Most Read