Video students promote businesses

A group of students want to “shout out” about Campbell River while at the same time gain valuable experience in business and new media

A group of students want to “shout out” about Campbell River while at the same time gain valuable experience in business and new media.

Ten students, from Grade 9 up to 21-years-old, fresh off a summer video production and animation program, want to profile local businesses and social groups to a world-wide audience.

“We would like to interview local business owners and have them tell the world why their business is so integral to Campbell River and what they love about living and working here,” says Diana Camerin, career facilitator at Timberline school and organizer of what’s being called the Shout-Out Campbell River Campaign.

Camerin’s ultimate goal is to produce videos good enough to be played in BC Ferries’ terminals.

The videos will highlight a business and include on-screen interviews as well as footage of the business.

In exchange for the exposure, the students are asking for small donations.

“For a jar full of pennies we will go into your business, organization, school or event and help you Shout Out about Campbell River,” Camerin says.

“This is not about asking for a handout, it’s an opportunity to do some good work for the community.”

The class has a goal to raise enough pennies this school year to fill an entire school bus.

The students only have two cameras and two computers for editing but could use more.

Funds raised will go towards equipment, bursaries for students to further their education, the new Life Skills house at Timberline that is slated to open next month, as well as any other programs in the school district in need of extra dollars.

“It’s up to the kids to discuss what happens with the funds,” Camerin says.

“They will have to decide how it’s dispersed and what the application form (to apply for funding) will look like.”

Students also hope to bolster tourism to the region by sharing the videos they create on YouTube and on the group’s website, www.shoutoutcanada.webs.com which is still a work in progress.

All businesses interviewed by the students will be listed on the website’s calendar and will also receive a sign to place in their window.

Transcripts of all the interviews will be available under the website’s Comments section.

For those who prefer to not appear on video, the students can create a graphic novel, similar to a cartoon, with word bubbles to describe the business or organization.

“We’ve tried to get creative and do as much as we could,” Camerin says.

“Our ultimate goal with this is to have it duplicated in other school districts.”

Local businesses interested in being profiled by the students can visit the students’ website at www.shoutoutcanada.webs.com and click the Contact Us link.