Preparations for Santa’s journey are in place!

Visit www.noradsanta.org to follow Santa’s progress from the North Pole

Santa’s elves have been busier than usual this year preparing for Santa’s launch tonight and like usual you can keep track of the Jolly Man’s progress around the world thanks to NORAD (North American Air Defence).

Visit www.noradsanta.org to follow Santa’s progress from the North Pole and to discover new surprises on Santa’s Activity Page.

For even more fun holiday activities, visit the About Santa page.

For more than 50 years, NORAD and its predecessor, the Continental Air Defense Command (CONAD) have tracked Santa’s flight.

The tradition began in 1955 after a Colorado Springs-based Sears Roebuck & Co. advertisement misprinted the telephone number for children to call Santa.

Instead of reaching Santa, the phone number put kids through to the CONAD Commander-in-Chief’s operations “hotline.”

The Director of Operations at the time, Colonel Harry Shoup, had his staff check the radar for indications of Santa making his way south from the North Pole.

Children who called were given updates on his location, and a tradition was born.

In 1958, the governments of Canada and the United States created a bi-national air defense command for North America called the North American Aerospace Defense Command, also known as NORAD, which then took on the tradition of tracking Santa.

Since that time, NORAD men, women, family and friends have selflessly volunteered their time to personally respond to phone calls and emails from children all around the world.

In addition, they now track Santa using the internet.

Millions of people who want to know Santa’s whereabouts now visit the NORAD Tracks Santa website.

Finally, media from all over the world rely on NORAD as a trusted source to provide updates on Santa’s journey.

 

How They Track Santa Radar

 

NORAD uses four high-tech systems to track Santa – radar, satellites, Santa Cams and fighter jets.

Tracking Santa starts with the NORAD radar system called the North Warning System.

This powerful radar system consists of 47 installations strung across the northern border of North America.

On Dec. 24, NORAD monitors the radar systems continuously for indications that Santa Claus has left the North Pole.

The moment that radar indicates Santa has lifted off, we use our second detection system.

Satellites positioned in geo-synchronous orbit at 22,300 miles from the Earth’s surface are equipped with infrared sensors, which enable them to detect heat. Amazingly, Rudolph’s bright red nose gives off an infrared signature, which allows our satellites to detect Rudolph and Santa.

The third tracking system is the Santa Cam network.

They began using it in 1998, which is the year we put our Santa Tracking program on the internet.

Santa Cams are ultra-cool, high-tech, high-speed digital cameras that are pre-positioned at many locations around the world.

NORAD only uses these cameras once a year.

The cameras capture images and videos of Santa and his reindeer as they make their journey around the world.

 

Fighter Jet

 

The fourth system is made up of fighter jets.

Canadian NORAD fighter pilots flying the CF-18 fighter jets intercept and welcome Santa to North America.

In the United States, American NORAD fighter pilots in either the F-15, F-16 or the F-22 get the thrill of flying alongside Santa and his famous reindeer: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Donner, Blitzen and, of course, Rudolph.

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