Austin Johnson carves the deep bowl at the Campbell River skate park in the early afternoon in a photo from A Day in the Life of Campbell River, the Ma Murray Award finalist in the Photo Essay Award category,. Photo by Marc Kitteringham / Campbell River Mirror

Austin Johnson carves the deep bowl at the Campbell River skate park in the early afternoon in a photo from A Day in the Life of Campbell River, the Ma Murray Award finalist in the Photo Essay Award category,. Photo by Marc Kitteringham / Campbell River Mirror

Mirror a finalist in five Ma Murray Community Newsmedia Award categories

Winners will be unveiled in May 14 newspaper industry gala event

The Campbell River Mirror is up for five Ma Murray Community Newsmedia Awards from the BC and Yukon Community News Media Association Saturday, May 14.

The awards recognize excellence in advertising, writing and photography as well as special publications as created by community news organizations around British Columbia and Yukon in 2021. Three finalists have been announced for all categories and the winners will be unveiled at a BCYCNA gala Saturday, May 14 at the River Rock Resort and Casino.

Mirror editor Alistair Taylor is a finalist in the Editorial Award category for the June 30, 2021 editorial: “We can’t move forward as a nation without coming to terms with this stark indictment of our colonial past.”

Mirror multi-media journalist Marc Kitteringham is a finalist for the Spot News Award, Over 10,000 (circulation) for his photo “Family of slain Indigenous man confronts RCMP.”

Mirror staff members Marc Kitteringham Sean Feagan, Alistair Taylor and Taija Larmond are joint finalists in the Photo Essay Award for their teamwork on “A Day in the Life of Campbell River.”

Former Mirror staff member Sean Feagan is a finalist for two awards: Sports Photo Award, Under 10,000 for “On the ‘Green’” and Feature Video Award for “Cycle club volunteers work to improve Snowden Trail.”

Margaret “Ma” Murray was a Canadian newspaper editor, publisher and columnist, as well as an Order of Canada officer. She built a legendary reputation running newspapers in British Columbia’s northeast with a spicy wit, rural wisdom and strong opinions. Her editorials were often signed off with the phrase “And that’s fer damshur!”

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