A helpful social distancing infographic gives advice to keep people healthy. Black Press file photo

How to be socially distant

Tips and tricks for social isolation

A few weeks ago, nobody knew what social distancing was and even now, it can be hard to really understand what it means.

Most generally, it means limiting contact with other people in order to prevent the spread of an infectious disease. That practice itself is nothing new. The idea of quarantine goes back to the 14th century, when ships coming in to Venice were told to wait offshore for 40 days to prevent the spread of plague.

That’s where the word “quarantine” comes from. More recently, the Government of Canada signed an updated Quarantine Act into law after the SARS outbreak of 2003.

Under that law, which is in place today, the government has the power to designate quarantine stations in buildings across the country (including privately-owned ones) to stop the spread of a disease. As a law, it is enforceable and would be mandatory if in place.

Thankfully, we’re not there yet.

Social distancing is like quarantine-lite. It is a suggested action, which allows people to have some control over how fast the virus spreads. What it really means though, is staying at home and avoiding contact with anyone who doesn’t live in your house.

The only official advice from governments as of March 23 is to avoid crowded places, non-essential gatherings and limit contact with other people.

In reality, social isolation means more than just that.

Assume the virus is everywhere. That is the easiest way to ensure people take the proper precautions without going to a mandatory lockdown. If you assume the virus to be everywhere, the only way you can limit the spread is to stay away from other people.

Thanks to social media and an interconnected world, this is not a solitary confinement sentence. It is only a physical separation to make sure things don’t get out of control.

Going outside is still allowed. You are still allowed to hike, to ride your bike, work and play in your yard and walk your dog. These activities just have to be done far away from other people.

Campbell River and the area have plenty of trails and places to play that are far away from anyone else. We only ask that those venturing outside take extra care not to injure themselves and end up in the hospital.

Activity can be done inside as well. Online yoga classes, home gym training, dance lessons, and treadmills can all be great ways to stay fit and healthy. Strong bodies have strong immune systems, and activity helps feed the brain. For more brain food, try learning a new skill while you’re isolated. Pick up knitting, sock darning, a musical instrument (provided you have patient roommates) or a paintbrush.

This is also a good time to learn about an area of study that you’ve been curious about, but have never had the time to delve into.

A major part of social distancing is the “social” side. Technology allows us to see and talk to our friends even if they are in a different building, and people should be taking advantage of that.

People are scared, and reaching out to loved ones is a great way to show how we’re all in this together and that they are not alone. With all this extra time on peoples’ hands, they are going to be much more receptive to a text message or phone call.

Through this social distancing phenomenon, people will still need to eat and buy food. Restaurants have been ordered to close their dining rooms by the provincial government, but many are still delivering food to people’s doors.

Some things to remember are to keep a regular routine, shower and groom every day, avoid drinking and smoking cannabis to excess and try to live as normal of a life as you can. Eat healthy and be active.

Social distancing means avoiding physical contact (being in the same room) with other people, limiting outings to grocery shopping and picking up medications, taking care of yourself and enjoying the time you have. Call your mom and wash your hands.

RELATED: Introducing Campbell River Isolationpalooza 2020

Mayor shocked by Campbell Riverites not taking pandemic serious enough



marc.kitteringham@campbellrivermirror.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

CommunityCoronavirussocial media

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

New electric buses are coming to school districts. (Submitted photo)
New electric school buses will drive North Island forward

Travel on electric school buses is smoother, quieter, and healthier than traditional diesel buses

Destroyed window at Ministry of Social Development offices in Campbell River. Photo supplied by Campbell River RCMP
Police investigating arson in downtown Campbell River

Fire set at BC Employment and Assistance Office

May 3-9 was Mental Health Week, and the Campbell River RCMP is encouraging people, especially men, to seek emotional help if it’s needed. Black Press file photo
Campbell River RCMP encouraging men to seek emotional help if needed

‘Taking care of our Mental Health is not simply about accessing counselling,’ says Const. Maury Tyre

Campbell River’s waste collection schedule will be changing after Victoria Day. Photo by Marc Kitteringham, Campbell River Mirror.
Campbell River Garbage pickup schedule changing after May Long Weekend

Pickup day will change after every statutory holiday

A B.C. Centre for Disease Control map showing new COVID-19 cases by local health area for the week of April 25-May 1. (BCCDC image)
Vancouver Island’s COVID-19 case counts continue to trend down

Fewer than 200 active cases on the Island, down from highs of 500-plus earlier this spring

(The Canadian Press)
Trudeau won’t say whether Canada supports patent waiver for COVID-19 vaccines

‘Canada is at the table to help find a solution’

A sign indicating face coverings are required by the establishment is pictured on the front door of a business in Vancouver, B.C., Friday, April 9, 2021. COVID-19 cases have been on a steady increase in the province of British Columbia over the past week. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
A sign indicating face coverings are required by the establishment is pictured on the front door of a business in Vancouver, B.C., Friday, April 9, 2021. COVID-19 cases have been on a steady increase in the province of British Columbia over the past week. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
B.C. to start releasing neighbourhood-specific COVID numbers after data leak

Documents obtained by the Vancouver Sun show cases broken down by neighbourhoods

Ladysmith RCMP safely escorted the black bear to the woods near Ladysmith Cemetary. (Town of Ladysmith/Facebook photo)
Black bear tranquillized, relocated after wandering around residential Ladysmith

A juvenile black bear was spotted near 2nd Avenue earlier Friday morning

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry and Health Minister Adrian Dix update B.C.’s COVID-19 situation at the B.C. legislature, April 29, 2021. (B.C. government)
B.C.’s COVID-19 case count creeps up, seven more deaths

445 people in hospital, 157 in intensive care

Summerland’s positive test rate is much higher than surrounding local health areas, according to internal BC CDC documents. (BC CDC)
Summerland 3rd behind Surrey, Abbotsford in daily per capita COVID-19 cases

Interior Health is rolling out additional vaccine availability to the community

Amazon is pausing its Prime Day marketing event in Canada this year amid ongoing COVID-19 outbreaks at its facilities in Ontario. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Amazon Prime Day halted in Canada due to COVID-19 outbreaks in warehouses

The event was postponed to protect the health and safety of employees and customers, the company says

Ally Thomas, 12, seen in an undated family handout photo, died on April 14 from a suspected overdose. Her family says they are frustrated more public supports weren't available when they tried to get her help. THE CANADIAN PRESS
Minister says suspected overdose death of 12-year-old pushing B.C. to ‘do better’

Minister Sheila Malcolmson of Mental Health and Addictions says the government is working ‘as hard as we can’ to build a system of care for youths

At this Highway 3 check point, police officers will be asking for identification from drivers, documentation regarding the driver’s name and address, and the purpose for the driver’s travel. (RCMP)
No fines handed out at 1st COVID-19 roadblock as checks move across B.C.

Cpl. Chris Manseau says a total of 127 vehicles were stopped at a roadblock in the Manning Park area

A spectator looks on as the Olympic Caldron is relit in downtown Vancouver, Wednesday, February 12, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Small majority of B.C. residents in favour of a Vancouver 2030 Olympic bid: survey

A new survey shows a split over the possibility of public money being spent to organize and host the winter games

Most Read