Community Foundation brings Vital Signs Report to Campbell River

The Campbell River Community Foundation launches its 2018 Vital Signs report to the community of Campbell River on Tuesday, Oct. 2.

Vital Signs examines 13 key issues that contribute to community wellbeing, and the 2018 report revisits many of the same statistics as the 2016 report to examine changes in the community.

Vital Signs is a national program led by community foundations and coordinated by Community Foundations of Canada that aims to inspire civic engagement and provide focus for public debate in our communities and around the world. Vital Signs reports are used by residents, business, community organizations, universities and colleges, and government leaders to take action and direct resources where they will have the greatest impact.

“The purpose of Vital Signs is to examine and raise awareness of the strengths and challenges facing Campbell River and area,” says Jim Harris, Chair of the Campbell River Community Foundation. “We know that affordable housing for all members of our community has become more challenging as rental vacancy rates have decreased and the value of homes has increased.

“But we also celebrate positive changes – for example, the overall poverty rate, the child poverty rate, and the seniors’ poverty rate have all decreased slightly in the last few years. Having an understanding of what’s happening at the community level helps the Campbell River Community Foundation to make effective decisions, and helps our local charitable, service, and government agencies to do the same.”

In addition to data collection and statistical analysis, the Community Foundation has engaged the community in a consultative process that invited the inclusion of local opinions and information.

Issue areas included are Arts & Culture, Belonging & Leadership, Children & Youth, Environment, Getting Started in the Community, Health, Housing, Income Gap, Learning, Recreation, Safety, Seniors and Work.

The Community Foundation will be hosting an event to celebrate the launch of Vital Signs on Tuesday, Oct. 2 from 5-7 p.m. at the Maritime Heritage Centre. Following the launch, complimentary printed copies of the report will be available at City Hall, the Chamber of Commerce, the Visitor Centre, Coastal Community Credit Union and Broadstreet Properties. A digital edition will also be available on the Community Foundation’s website at www.crfoundation.ca/vital-signs.

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