Layton Lavik wrote Hello, This is Earth! for his first son, Lincoln. laytonlavik.com image

Layton Lavik wrote Hello, This is Earth! for his first son, Lincoln. laytonlavik.com image

Campbell River author dreamed up idea for first kids book underwater

Layton Lavik came up with much of his manuscript during his time as a commercial diver

It is no secret many of us come up with our best ideas while in the shower.

Something about being surrounded by water must make our brains come up with concepts quickly.

While working as a commercial diver, Layton Lavik said he spent extended periods of time alone underwater. As he worked, the Campbell River resident came up with much of the manuscript for his debut children’s book, Hello! This is Earth!

It was originally written for his first son, Lincoln.

“Before he was born, I wanted to create something to share my love of science and astronomy with him,” Lavik said.

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The local author describes the book as a ‘fun, factual story told by Earth, with a poetic rhyme scheme and cadence.’

“After reading a number of educational children’s books I began to realize a consistent trend,” he explained. “Either the books were way too bogged down with facts that my son would get bored or, on the flip side, they were extremely basic and lacked educational depth.”

This realization convince him to develop and publish the book.

“I believe that it fills a need in the literacy space where education and entertainment don’t always pair nicely,” he said. “Parents and children learn about our wonderful planet together and the vibrant illustrations really capture imaginations.”

Lavik said he is excited to share Hello! This is Earth! in local shops, and libraries.

It is also available online through Amazon.



ronan.odoherty@campbellrivermirror.com

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